I am Jackie Robinson

May 27, 2015 by

jackieI am Jackie Robinson

By Brad Meltzer

Illustrated by Christopher Eliopoulos

Brad Meltzer’s series Ordinary People Change the World show heroes all throughout history in a new light. Each book is told in first person, with the historical figure telling the story about their lives and accomplishments. The illustrations are comical and fun, making it an interesting read for younger kids as well as older. What makes the books unique is that the heroes are drawn to look like children, letting the reader relate to these normally bigger-than-life people.

In his newest book in the series, Brad Meltzer shows the life of Jackie Robinson, world renowned athlete and warrior for equality. Jackie was the first African American to play on a major-league baseball team. Though he faced discrimination all of his life, Jackie learned tolerance from his mother and applied it wherever he could. People were mean to him on the field and off of it, but Jackie kept his head high and played baseball with everything he had. His example opened the doors for all races to play together.

Recommended for grades K-2.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

If you enjoy I am Jackie Robinson, make sure to check out the other books in the series!

ameliarosaalbert

Print Friendly

Print this entry

Share

Books to Sing

May 26, 2015 by

That Special Little Baby by Jane Ann Peddicord and illustrated by Meilo So

Singing is one of the five simple everyday practices a parent can do to help get their child ready to read.  Because I love music AND I love books, it’s always fun to find a book that I can sing to a tune.  I came upon this one today by surprise, as I was going through books that have not gone home with someone in a while.  As I was reading, the tune to the Beverly Hillbillies came to mind, I gave it a try and voila!

Now, it’s a bit of a stretch on the refrain ”it grew, and grew and grew,” because you’ll need to extend the final grew on several notes of the melody.  But, I think a child will love to chime in with you and sing groo—oo—oo—oo!

Give it a try and see how it works for you.  I hope you enjoy it!

Hopefully you know the theme song for the “Beverly Hillbillies.”  If not, the song “The Ballad of Jed Clampett” was written and composed by Paul Henning.

Print Friendly

Print this entry

Share

Early Literacy Tip of the Week

May 25, 2015 by

Create special places in your home where your child can talk, sing, read, write, and play. It doesn’t cost a thing!

Print Friendly

Print this entry

Share

Kid Picks

May 24, 2015 by

1 cupcake diaries2 popularity papers3 stampede4 weird school

Print Friendly

Print this entry

Share

Here We Go

May 22, 2015 by

Watch as Miss Nina and Wren demonstrate the “Here We Go” rhyme that we use in our Babes in Arms storytimes at the Davis and Haggard Libraries, which is suitable for pre-walkers 0-9 months old. Try this rhyme at home and then come to Babes in Arms to learn more!

Summer storytimes will begin on June 8th. Babes in Arms will be at Davis on Tuesdays at 10am and at Haggard on Wednesdays at 9:30am.

Print Friendly

Print this entry

Share

Sleeping Cinderella and Other Princess Mix-ups

May 21, 2015 by

by Stephanie Clarkson

Most of us are familiar with these four princesses: Snow White, Rapunzel, Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella.  Could we have ever imagined these fairy tales could change and we could read a new version? Well enjoy this mixed-up version of these princesses.  Snow White is fed up with her sloppy housemates and just wants peace and quiet.  What could be quieter than a lonely tower where Rapunzel lives?  Rapunzel who has endured a life of isolation can’t wait to meet people and party.  Cinderella exhausted from the demands of her stepmother and stepsisters can’t even imagine going to a ball. Who is willing to dance the night away, Rapunzel. Cinderella just wants to sleep and where does she find the sofest bed which happens to be occupied by Sleeping Beauty.  Sleeping Beauty awakenend by an accidental kiss is searching for an active life and becomes acquainted with the 7 dwarfs who are in desperate need of help.  Will these mixed-up princesses find happiness with their new lifestyles?

Sleeping Cinderella and Other Princesses is a book written in rhyme and the words seem to flow together and create a realistic fantasy that can be enjoyed by everyone.

Reviewed by: Bev (Davis)

 

 

 

Print Friendly

Print this entry

Share

Henry Finds His Word

May 20, 2015 by

henry finds his wordHenry Finds His Word
by Lindsay Ward

Henry is looking for his first word. It seems “bbbghsh” is not working out so well; no one seems to know it means bottle… or ball… or book. Henry searches all over. In his crib, in the toy box, but he doesn’t quite know what a word looks like. So Henry asks some friends to help. He asks a cat, a bird, and a bunny, but they’re not much help at all. Will Henry ever find his word?

What an adorable book about an important milestone! Parents and little ones will enjoy reading this book together, and talking about their very first words.

Recommended for ages 2 to 5.

(Jocelyn, Davis Library)

Print Friendly

Print this entry

Share

The War That Saved My Life

May 19, 2015 by

The war that saved my lifeThe War That Saved My Life

By: Kimberly Bradley

This wonderful historical novel by Kimberly Bradley explores WWII through the eyes of a disabled child. Ada and Jamie Smith live with their abusive, neglectful mother in London. Ada is crippled by an untreated club foot which keeps her dependent on her mother. With the threat of German bombs hitting London, parents are eager to send their children to the countryside. Ada’s mother plans to send Jamie, but intends to keep Ada in London. Ada takes it upon herself to teach herself to walk while her mother is away at work and she escapes with Jamie to the train bound for the countryside. The children are placed with Susan Smith, a woman without any experience with children. The children are emotionally damaged, but slowly they come to trust Ms. Smith and thrive under her care. Susan’s care is life-changing for Ada. Ada also gets the chance to ride Susan’s horse and she enjoys the freedom of being able to travel without walking on her club foot. This story, set against a backdrop of war, is both uplifting and heartwarming.

Print Friendly

Print this entry

Share

Early Literacy Tip of the Week

May 18, 2015 by

For very young children, art and early writing skills are one and the same. Make art a regular part of playtime. Those crazy scribbles are the first step to learning how to write when they are older.

Print Friendly

Print this entry

Share

Kid Picks

May 17, 2015 by

babymouse 1royal easter 2squish 3turkey tot 4

Print Friendly

Print this entry

Share