A Dark, Dark Cave

June 29, 2016 by

darkcaveA Dark, Dark Cave by Eric Hoffman and illustrated by Corey R. Tabor

The illustrations of A Dark, Dark Cave feature a brother and older sister exploring a cave with their flashlights, only to reveal, (spoiler alert) they are just pretending, and being a bit loud in the process!  So, what should they do now?  You guessed.  Play another imaginary game.  Children love to use their imaginations, and this great little rhyming story is attuned to that.  Were you a child who liked to play under a blanket, placed under two chairs?

Harrington Library’s Family Place area has a “Hideaway Cube” which is covered with a blue netlike cloth.  Two or three children at a time fit under the net, and I’ve seen children in it playing, reading quietly, or “hiding.” It’s perfect for the imaginative child.  Come visit us today, and bring your imagination.

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Kid Picks

June 26, 2016 by

Who Let the Ghosts Out
Ratscalibur The Barftastic Life of Louie Burger
No Valentines for Katie Woo

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Rain Fish

June 25, 2016 by

I have enjoyed so many of Lois Ehlert’s children’s books so when I saw her new book, Rain Fish, I couldn’t wait to take a peek.  Once again her creativity and inventive ideas transform this book into an art project that can be enjoyed by any parent or child.  By using recycled materials and clever rhyming words Lois Ehlert turns another book into a treasure to be enjoyed by everyone.

I’d give it:  5 stars

4stars

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Cecil’s Pride

June 23, 2016 by

cecilWhen Cecil the lion was killed in 2015, the news made international headlines.  In Cecil’s Pride: The True Story of a Lion King, young readers learn more about Cecil and his extraordinary life before his death.

When Cecil was challenged by another male lion, and forced to abandon his territory, Cecil unexpectedly paired up with another male lion.  Male lions are fiercely protective of their prides and typically do not pair up, so this was highly unusual.  Cecil and Jericho, however, were stronger together. When Cecil was tragically killed by hunters, Cecil’s pride (especially the cubs) were in danger.  Amazingly, Jericho spared the cubs and adopted them into his own pride.

Young animal lovers (and budding conservationists) will pore over the quality photographs and enjoy the narrative of this unlikely friendship.  The author team is a father and his two daughters, and they’ve produced many photo biographies of true animal friendships.  Check out this one or another one by the Hatkoff’s.

cecil and jericho

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Grumpy Pants by Claire Messer

June 22, 2016 by

grumpypantsGrumpy Pants by Claire Messer

Are you and your toddler feeling hot, and bothered this summer?  A bit grumpy?  So is Penguin in Claire Messer’s book, Grumpy Pants.

Penguin is not really sure why he’s in a bad mood, so he tries stomping home, pulling off all of his grumpy clothes, bit by bit, until he counts to three and jumps in the bath.  Eventually, he feels better and goes to bed with a fresh attitude for tomorrow.  This is a perfect book to share with toddlers who are learning to manage their emotions.  It might even elicit a giggle as Penguin takes off his grumpy underpants.

Grumpy Pants is Claire Messer’s first picture book, and I’m looking forward to more from her!

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Hector and Hummingbird

June 21, 2016 by

Hector and HummingbirdHector and Hummingbird

By: Nicholas John Frith

Hector is a bear with a big problem. His best friend, a tiny hummingbird, is so NOISY!! If that isn’t bad enough, Hummingbird copies Hector too.

Hey Hector!

            Are you scratching?

            I’m going to scratch too!

            Look! I’m the best scratcher, aren’t I?

            Hector?

            Hec-torrr??

This story made me laugh out loud. Kids will be able to relate to Hummingbird while parents might relate with Hector. The brilliant, bright illustrations are the perfect complement to the story. A real winner!

Renee (Parr library)

 

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Kid Picks

June 19, 2016 by

Clifford's Tricks Even More Short and ShiveryCalling All Cars

 

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Their Great Gift

June 17, 2016 by

6122RV-bYRLTheir Great Gift

By John Coy

Photographs by Wing Young Huie

Immigration is a major topic in our world. Their Great Gift is a book for more than children, it can help adults and children alike understand how hard it can be to leave home for a new country. Using very simple text and real photographs of immigrants, it gives a snapshot of both families and individuals and their lives in their new country. As it discusses challenges, it’s aimed at the children of immigrants and how their advice to their children is shaped by their own hardworking ideals.

“Work hard.”

“Do well in school.”

“Never give up.”

With this advice and the great gift of bettering their lives for the sake of their children, this story poses a meaningful question about what those children will do with that gift.

Recommended for ages 5-9.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Beastly Verse

June 15, 2016 by

img_7300Beastly Verse

by JooHee Yoon

When I was a child I had a book of poems that included Laura E. Richards’ Eletelephony:

Once there was an elephant,
Who tried to use the telephant—
No! no! I mean an elephone
Who tried to use the telephone—
(Dear me! I am not certain quite
That even now I’ve got it right.)
Howe’er it was, he got his trunk
Entangled in the telephunk;
The more he tried to get it free,
The louder buzzed the telephee—
(I fear I’d better drop the song
Of elephop and telephong!)

I thought it was hilarious, and I memorized it and recited it back to my parents any time the words “elephant” or “telephone” were mentioned around me for probably the next year-and-a-half. So that was my introduction to poetry, and from it I learned that poems can be interesting and fun and silly and wonderful, and the fact that I memorized this poem without being prompted at the age of five or six still amazes me. So imagine my delight when I picked up JooHee Yoon’s vibrantly illustrated Beastly Verse and found, among 15 others by poets such as Christina Rossetti, William Blake, and Lewis Carroll, Laura E. Richards’ Eletelephony!

This is a collection of 16 delightful poems about animals, with bright, bold, whimsical illustrations, several of which fold out, hiding some surprises! There’s enough variety here to make you wonder what will come next, and Yoon has done an excellent job of picking a small number of quality poems that will keep the book from feeling overwhelming. If you’re looking for an introductory book of poetry to read aloud with your child, I can see this one sparking the imagination just as the one I had as a child did mine.

Happy reading!

Reviewed by: Lara (Haggard Library)

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Kid Picks

June 12, 2016 by

ivy and bean meet cecile scary stories

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