Early Literacy Tip of the Week

July 6, 2015 by

Pretend play helps children think symbolically and develop oral language skills. As children play store or pretend to be an animal, they talk about what they’re doing. They practice putting thoughts into words.

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Last Stop on Market Street

July 2, 2015 by

last stop on market streetLast Stop on Market Street

by Matt de la Pena; illustrations by Christian Robinson

This simple story follows CJ and his Nana as they ride the bus across town after church. CJ has many questions to be answered – Why don’t they have a car? How come that man is blind? Why is this area of the city so dirty? Luckily, his Nana is there to point out the beauty in each situation.

Christian Robinson’s illustrations are colorful and bold –  a perfect complement to Matt de la Pena’s strong visual language. I loved the use of similes and metaphors spotted throughout the beginning. Encourage your child to describe some of their routines or draw the world around them.

Reviewed by Kate (Haggard)

 

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Early Literacy Tip of the Week

June 29, 2015 by

Kids love their own names! Have your child help you think of other words that start with the same sound as the first letter in their name —like for Jocelyn; Jump, Juice, or Jelly.

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Kid Picks

June 28, 2015 by

1 land of stories 32 magic tree house3 vanishing coin

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App Time

June 27, 2015 by

will and kateWe explored a free book and activity app this week.

The book app was  Kate & William: A Royal Fairytale by Ink Robin (free for iPad and iPhone)

A fairytale romance app about Prince William and Kate Middleton that has background music, high quality illustrations, amusing and well-placed sound effects, along with a well-told story. There is no highlighted narration for this one. There is the option to “read to me” or “read it myself.” The bookmark icon in the top right allows you to quickly navigate through the pages.  There is also the option to shop for other book apps by the producer, Ink Robin, but it does require a specific swipe so that young ones won’t easily get to the App Store.  A very minimalist (book) app but highly recommended…and at the right price!

everyday grooves appThe activity app, Everyday Grooves by The Fred Rogers Center, pairs music with common routines such as Clean Up time, Get Dressed time, etc. You can set the alarms to go off once or multiple times a day. You can silence all alarms or just some of the alarms. I can see this being a fun way to remind children (and parents), and set routines. There’s even a Love You! and Let’s Read! alarm.

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The Monkey and the Bee

June 26, 2015 by

 

 

 

The Monkey and the Bee

By C.P. Bloom

I LOVE this book!  Wordless and nearly wordless picture books are favorites of mine, as they provide opportunities for the reader to discuss the pictures, demonstrate reading with expression, and have tons of fun. In Bloom’s book, a simple story of a monkey, a banana and a bee is told.  It is fantastic fun to watch their adventure unfold through illustrator Peter Raymundo’s marvelous artwork. Will the monkey share his banana? Will the monkey and the bee learn to get along? What will happen to the lion? Yes, there is also a lion! Want to know more?  Check out this awesome book and join the fun.  Did I mention that I LOVE this book?! I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. Happy reading!

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Duck’s Vacation

June 25, 2015 by

Duck’s Vacation by Gilad Soffer

Aahh! Duck is just settling in for a relaxing visit to the sea (complete with beach chair, cooling drink and an ice cream) when his peace and quiet is thwarted by interrupting readers. In one quick page turn Duck is shocked to lose his sunglasses and his ice cream cone! Another flick of the page and Duck wises up. He warns readers, “Do. Not. Turn. Any. More. Pages. No matter what!” Well, how can any reader resist? On each new page duck’s vacation becomes more impossible to enjoy as readers unwittingly plague him with a toe-biting crab, noisy crowds, a snowstorm and pirates. Duck-eating pirates! Now it’s up to readers to get Duck out of his predicament by doing precisely what he asked them not to do – turn pages.

Soffer wisely pairs spare text with colorful illustrations for the maximum mirth. Reminiscent of There Are No Cats in This Book (Schwarz), Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus (Willems) and Press Here (Tullet), this import from Israel is sure to delight readers of all ages.

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Touch the Brightest Star

June 24, 2015 by

by Christie Matheson

While looking at our new books I came across, “Touch the Brightest Star” by Christie Matheson.  She also wrote, “Tap the Magic Tree” and  illustrated both books.  The illustrations are beautifully blended watercolors that begin in the morning and drift into the night.  Each page pulls you into the book as you wave, press, blow, and pat, tap, count to three, swipe, blink, trace, rub, close your eyes, nod and touch the brightest star.  What a great book to interact with your children and let their imaginations soar on each and every page.

I enjoyed this book and even though I read it by myself I followed all the directions which made the book so much fun.  This book can be enjoyed by young children as well as older children.  The interaction that is required just pulls you into the magic of the book.

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Tick Tock

June 23, 2015 by

Watch as Miss Nina and Wren demonstrate the “Tick Tock” rhyme that we use in our Babes in Arms storytimes at the Davis and Haggard Libraries, which is suitable for pre-walkers 0-9 months old. Try this rhyme at home and then come to Babes in Arms to learn more!

Our summer storytime session goes until August 1st!

Babes in Arms
Davis – Tuesdays at 10am
Haggard – Wednesdays at 9:30am

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Early Literacy Tip of the Week

June 22, 2015 by

When talking with your child, look for opportunities to use different words to help build their vocabulary. The more words a child knows, the easier it is for your child to recognize them when beginning to read.

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