Archive for the ‘reviews’ Category

Two Speckled Eggs

August 22, 2014

 

Two Speckled Eggs

Two Speckled Eggs by Jennifer K. Mann

Ginger is excited about her birthday party.  Her mother insists she cannot exclude anyone from the invitations, but Ginger thinks Lyla Browning is weird.

This is a great story about friendship.  During the party games and the cake, Ginger begins to get a new perspective on Lyla, and when she opens Lyla’s present she discovers a tiny handmade bird’s nest with two chocolate malted-milk eggs.  Lyla’s gift is unique, as is Lyla.

Jennifer K. Mann’s author notes on the flap of the book say that she came up with the idea for the story from two photographs from her seventh birthday party.  Do you remember your seventh birthday?  This book may stir some memories!

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Underwater Dogs

August 21, 2014

61chELvbe8LUnderwater Dogs: Kid’s Edition

By Seth Casteel

When I look underwater, what do I see? So many doggies looking at me! With it’s fun, rhyming text and giggle-worthy photographs, Underwater Dogs is a fun summer read. See all different kinds of dogs fetch pool toys as they plunge into the water. You’d probably be surprised at the silly faces dogs make when they jump in a pool! These high speed photos capture doggies grinning and playing with enthusiasm. From the big boxer all the way down to the little dachshund, these puppies love to be in the water. Seth Casteel is an award winning pet photographer and this is his second book with dogs diving underwater, but you’ll see his fun photos in calendars and journals too!

Recommended for ages 3-6.

Nicole P. (Schimelpfenig)

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Feathers: Not Just for Flying

August 20, 2014

There are so many great new books about birds!

I was enamored with Feathers: Not Just for Flying by Melissa Stewart.  This picture book nonfiction title shares some of the unique qualities of feathers.  With a scrapbook-like illustration style, each page provides a line of bold text, with smaller text to give more detailed factual information.  Illustrations show the bird and the object their feathers are compared to.  I like that the feathers are compared to objects which could lead to further discussion between reader and listener.

“Feathers can dig holes like a backhoe…or carry building supplies like a forklift.”  There are swallows who use the feathers on their lower legs to dig tunnels; and there is the lovebird who puts nest materials under her rump feathers.

I was fascinated by all the ways that birds use their feathers and I’m sure children will be, too.

The young ornithologists in your life might also enjoy these new titles:

Mama Built a Little Nest by Jennifer Ward

Have you Heard the Nesting Bird? by Rita Gray

Nest by Jorey Hurley

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Moldylocks and the Three Beards

August 12, 2014

moldylocks and the three beardsMoldylocks and the Three Beards (Princess Pink and the Land of Fake-Believe #1)
by Noah Z. Jones

Princess Pink is not a princess, and she’s not pink. She doesn’t even like princesses or the color pink. She’s just a girl whose first name is Princess, and whose last name happens to be Pink. One night, Princess Pink wakes up hungry, but when she opens the refrigerator door to get a snack, she finds herself looking into a magical world. Leaning in to take a better look, Princess Pink tumbles into the refrigerator and begins to fall!

In the Land of Fake-Believe, things are very different from back home. Still feeling hungry, Princess Pink meets a girl named Moldylocks who takes her to the house of the Three Beards to find something to eat, but the two girls soon find there’s more than chili waiting for them at the Three Beards’ house…

princess pink and moldylocks

You may think you know where this story is going, but it’s different from any version of Goldilocks and the Thee Bears you’ve ever read before, and funnier too! With a collection of strange characters like Mother Moose and Tunacorn, kids will be laughing out loud at the antics of Princess Pink and Moldylocks.

Perfect for fans of humor, cartoon-like illustrations, and all around ridiculousness. This Princess does her own rescuing!

Early chapter book. Recommended for ages 5 to 7.

(Jocelyn, Davis Library)

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Last-But-Not-Least Lola Going Green

August 7, 2014

Last-But-Not-Least Lola Going Green (Last But Not Least Lola) CoverLast-But-Not-Least Lola Going Green

By Christine Pakkala

  2nd grader Lola Zuckerman is tired of always being last in her classroom where her teacher loves to put everything in alphabetical order.  Not only is she last in roll call but she’s also last when students share their ideas for a “going green” contest.  All of those great ideas she has bouncing around in her head and they’re already taken by the 18 students ahead of her in class!  What to do?  Grandma has told her all about a worm composting idea for her garden but that seems ridiculous.  Could such a thing exist?  Could it help her win the contest?  Could she actually come out first in something? And what about her ex-best friend Amanda Anderson who is not only the first in roll call but is also her class rival.  Will they ever be friends again or will the contest create an even bigger wall between them?

Thanks to quirky yet fully developed characters with humor reminiscent of Clementine and Ramona, this early chapter book series is definitely on my list of recommendations for both boys and girls who like their stories realistic yet funny.  Delightful illustrations by Paul Hoppe are scattered throughout – a special plus for those children new to chapter books.

This is book one in the series with the second to follow later this year.  I, for one, will be on the lookout for more Lola!

Reviewed by Connie (Parr Library)

 

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Princess Posey and the Next-Door Dog

August 6, 2014

Princess Posey and the Next-Door Dog

Stephanie Greene

I am always on the lookout for fiction series to recommend to children transitioning out of easy readers and into chapter books.  The Princess Posey series fits that bill perfectly.  The third installment in this charming series is called Princess Posey and the Next-Door Dog.  Posey’s family doesn’t have a pet, but she has to write about either a pet of her own or a pet that she hopes to have one day for Miss Lee’s classroom assignment.  So Posey is excited when a new neighbor moves in with a dog.  But Posey has a problem:  “She is secretly a little afraid of dogs.”  The dog next door is huge and has a very loud bark.  Posey decides she must face her fears after talking to her wise grandfather.  There is the perfect amount of tension as Posey meets the dog and she ends up helping the poor animal out of a predicament.  The story has a nice resolution and I enjoyed it very much.

The text of this early chapter book is generously sprinkled with lively black-and-white illustrations.  The short paragraphs and the age-appropriate story line should grab the attention of newly independent readers.

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My Blue Bunny, Bubbit

August 5, 2014

indexMy Blue Bunny, Bubbit

By Maggie Smith

Bubbit is a very special bunny. The little girl has had him since she was a baby. Her Nonni made him for her. He’s blue, with a red ribbon, and a row of little x’s on his foot. In just a few weeks, the little girl will have a sibling. Her Nonni comes to stay over and they decide to make a new friend for her baby brother, just like Bubbit.

After deciding to make an elephant for her little brother, they look for just the perfect fabric. They have a lot of choices, but Bubbit seems to think the elephant should be yellow. Using one of the girl’s favorite coats, they work together to make her new brother a wonderful friend. Nonni stitches her special x’s on the elephant’s foot and they blow lots of kisses into him before stitching him up.

This is a sweet story about family and new arrivals that’s perfect to share with your little one when they’re about to have a brother or sister. They might be inspired to make something special for their new sibling.

Recommended for Ages 4-8

Nicole P. (Schimelpfenig)

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Dreaming Up: A Celebration of Building

July 30, 2014

dreamingupDreaming Up: A Celebration of Building

By: Christy Hale

This books starts off with a quote by Madhu Thangavelu, an architect, in the beginning endpage:

‘If they can dream it, they can build it.’

Thus begins a journey into building. Illustrations of children creating juxtaposed with photographs of well-known buildings shows the similarities between child play and the world around us. A blanket tossed onto some chairs may be a fort to children, but its sloping roof looks similar to the Yoyogi National Stadium in Japan created by architect Kenzo Tange.  This is one of the many examples of architecture (and the architects that created the buildings) showcased in this book.

The illustrations and photos are accompanied with poetic text and the back pages give information concerning the buildings and their corresponding architects. Share this book with those that love to build and see if they get inspired!

Speaking of building, PPLS still has some upcoming building programs this summer; join us for:

Read! Build! Play! at Harrington Library on Friday, August 1st at 11:00 am (for ages 0-5)

Block Party at Parr Library on Wednesday, August 6th at 11:00 am (all ages)

Library Legos at Davis Library on Friday, August 15th at 3:00 pm (all ages)

Happy Building!

Reviewed by: Diana (Harrington Library)

 

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Oliver’s Tree

July 23, 2014

918dGhz4x5LOliver’s Tree

By Kit Chase

Oliver the elephant and his friends Lulu and Charlie love to play outside. When they play a game of hide and seek, his smaller friends climb into trees to hide. Oliver can see them and he tries and tries to reach them, but he’s not made for climbing.

Oliver’s friends try to find him a good tree for climbing. They find a low tree for him, but it’s too small. The one with bigger branches is too tall. Oliver gets frustrated and decides to take a nap on an old stump and his friends come up with the perfect plan. This is a fun and sweet story about friendship and kindness, full of adorable illustrations.

Recommended for Ages 3-5

Nicole P. (Schimelpfenig)

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1 to 20, Animals Aplenty

July 9, 2014

1 to 20 animals aplenty1 to 20, Animals Aplenty
by Katie Viggers

Inside the front cover of Katie Viggers’ 1 to 20, Animals Aplenty a baboon declares “Let’s count.” From there, a menagerie of animals represents numbers one through twenty, with a silly start at “1 fox in a pair of socks.” Viggers’ whimsical illustrations contain just enough detail to give you reason to linger over each and every page. Rhyming descriptions will elicit laughs. Definitely worth a look. If you enjoy it, try Viggers’ other book, Almost an Animal Alphabet.

1 fox in a pair of socks

Recommended for ages 3 to 7.

(Jocelyn, Davis Library)

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