Posts Tagged ‘boys’

Big Snow

December 16, 2013

Big Snow

By Jonathan Bean

Big Snow begins with an imaginative little boy who is anticipating a big winter snow storm. In David’s mind, the more snow that comes, the better it will be. As he precociously helps his mother around the house everything makes him think of snow; the suds from scrubbing the tub, the crisp white sheets while making the bed. He uses his imagination all while intermittently checking the weather station for the storms progress. After David drifts off into a nap, he wakes to see that the snow storm has past and has left a beautiful blanket of snow just as astonishing as in his dream.

Most of us know as children the delicious anticipation of waiting for a good snow storm to blow through your neighborhood.  If you have not had the pleasure of waiting for snow, this book captures the exact essence of those feelings. Its warm and cozy illustrations and thoughtful dialogue puts you right in David’s shoes and gets you ready for a “big snow”. This book is recommended for preschool ages and up.

snow3

Annette (Davis Library)

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The Things I Can Do

July 12, 2013

The Things I Can Do
by Jeff Mack

In his new book, The Things I Can Do, Jeff Mack calls on his inner-kid to tell a story of all the things he can do, all on his own. The rhyming text is written by hand in bold black crayon, and the illustrations are a collage of construction paper, stickers, tape, glue, crayon drawings, and all kinds of other stuff! This is a great book to read one-on-one. Younger kids will love pointing out all the components of the pictures. Adults and older kids will catch on to the humorous discrepancies of what young Jeff says he can do, and what he does do. A fun, funny, and explorative read. You might want to have some craft supplies and paper on hand, though. Kids may want to make their own book after reading this one!

Recommended for ages 5 to 8.

(Jocelyn, Davis Library)

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The Misadventures of Edgar and Allan Poe

May 21, 2013

Misadventures of Edgar and Allen PoeThe Misadventures of Edgar and Allan Poe Book One: The Tell-Tale Start

Written by Gordon McAlpine and illustrated by Sam Zuppardi

These mischievous twelve-year-olds are the great, great, great, great grandnephews of Edgar Allan Poe. They are one boy in two bodies or two boys with one mind and have a psychic connection with each other that gets them in trouble as often as it gets them out of it. Whether they’re building a replica of the Pit and Pendulum dungeon to scare the pants off the bullies at school, or trying to talk to their long dead uncle from beyond the grave, the twins are always in the middle of something unusual. Their talents catch the mysterious Ian Archer’s attention, who lures them to the isolated Gale Farm and OZitorium. He has dastardly plans for the twins, but with the help of mystical fortune cookies and their extremely well-trained cat, they can unravel the mystery of  Gale Farm and the professor behind it all.

Packed with fun illustrations and dark, whimsical humor, this book is definitely recommended for those who enjoyed the Time Warp Trio and Lemony Snicket.  This is an action-packed start to a series that promises many adventures with the Poe twins and Roderick Usher, their cat.

Recommended for ages 8 and up.

Nicki P. (Schimelpfenig)

 

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Navigating Early by Clare Vanderpool

March 4, 2013

 

Navigating Early

Navigating Early by Clare Vanderpool

 If you want a deeply layered story with thoughtful characters, then this just might be the book for you!  Navigating Early is also an adventure quest.  It took a while for me to start piecing it all together, but I loved it and didn’t want it to end.

At the end of World War II, Jack’s mother has died, and his father decides to send him to a boarding school in Maine.  It’s a strange new world compared to Kansas.  At first he tries to fit in with the other boys, but he ends up retreating into a friendship with Early Auden.  Early is different than the other boys (in today’s language he might be described as being on the autism spectrum).  When the two end up alone at school, Jack goes along on the venture Early has planned to find pi and a great black bear on the Appalachian Trail.  If you are a stargazer and a dreamer, you’ll love the many connections that Jack and Early make on their journey.

This is Vanderpool’s second novel.  She won the Newbery Award for Moon over Manifest, which is another complex and worthwhile read.

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Invasion of the Dognappers

December 10, 2012

Invasion of the Dognappers by Patrick Jennings is a solid choice for kids 8 to 12.  I think it will especially appeal to boys.

The story revolves around alien-obsessed Logan and his group of friends who investigate the disappearance of several dogs in town.  What I liked about this particular book is that Logan really does find aliens!  It’s a funny story and of course Logan saves the day and the dogs.

Patrick Jennings has several other popular novels.  One of my favorites is Faith and the Electric Dogs, which was on the 1998-1999 Texas Bluebonnet Award master list.  It’s an oldie, but a goodie!

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Do Super Heroes Have Teddy Bears?

September 27, 2012

Do Super Heroes Have Teddy Bears?

Carmela LaVigna Coyle

Do Super Heroes Have Teddy Bears?, is such an engaging picture book that uses rhymes to answer the questions. Do super heroes have to fix what they break?…Even when it was a mistake?…Does a super hero have to help with the dishes?…Unless there’s a genie who’ll grant us some wishes.  When some questions are posed by the little sister of a precocious boy, he knows just what to say to defend his superhero status.

The illustrations are a definite plus to accompany the words in this book; they are the icing on the cake to this darling  story. It’s so cute and clever that I would like to buy a copy for my own personal library.

Annette (Davis Library)

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Because

August 9, 2012

 Because by Richard Torrey

Are you guilty of using “because” to justify your actions? In this book Because, written and illustrated by Richard Torrey, a little boy does just that. From putting his dog in time out “because he cheated” to sneaking a piece of strawberry shortcake for him and his dog, “because” they’re hungry, are just a few reasons why he is justified in his actions.

I really enjoyed this tongue-in-cheek book; it really makes light of how one word “because” gets him out of getting into trouble.  He also uses this word for good in the end which gives the story a warm fuzzy undertone.  I think it’s one of my new favorites and I can’t wait to read more from this author.

Annette (Davis)

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Knucklehead: Tall Tales and Mostly True Stories of Growing Up Scieszka

May 14, 2012

Knucklehead:  Tall Tales and Mostly True Stories of Growing up Scieszka by Jon Scieszka

I picked up Knucklehead because someone recommended it as a funny read.  Jon Scieszka’s reputation as a favorite author of kids was a factor in my decision too.  I was not disappointed, and actually laughed out loud!  Jon Scieszka was the second oldest of six boys.  I grew up with one sibling, and the dynamics of larger families has always fascinated me.  Stories about a bunch of boys is hysterical, and mildly terrifying!  Scieszka has thrown in a couple of Knucklehead warnings for worried parents!

This 106 page memoir is filled with Scieszka’s old family photos, and short chapters that really don’t have to be read in order to be enjoyed.  I highly recommend it; it would be a great summer read-aloud.

Julie (Harrington)

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Darth Paper Strikes Back

March 16, 2012

 Darth Paper Strikes Back

  By: Tom Angleberger

You may have already heard that the 2012 Bluebonnet Award Winner is The Strange Case of Origami Yoda by Tom Angleberger, but did you know that Angleberger has a sequel to his award winning book? The newest title in the Origami Yoda series is Darth Paper Strikes Back. In this new book Harvey gets Dwight kicked out of school so all of the students at Ralph McQuarrie Middle School decide to make a case file trying to convince the school board to bring Dwight (and Origami Yoda) back. With more wisdom and adventure from Origami Yoda and more trouble from Darth Paper this book is laugh out loud funny. If you enjoyed The Strange Case of Origami Yoda then this new book is sure to become a quick favorite!

 Have a great spring break and happy reading!

-Lauren (Haggard Library)

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It’s Baseball Season at the Library!

April 25, 2011

Shoeless Joe & Black Betsy

by Phil Bildner

Did you ever hear the story of Shoeless Joe and his bat, Black Betsy? This story is about the baseball legend, Shoeless Joe Jackson and how his bat helped him to get the greatest rookie batting average in baseball. You can discover just how a bat needs to be cared for to help you really bat well, as well as how Shoeless Joe earned that famous nickname!

 Girl Wonder: A Baseball Story in Nine Innings

by Deborah Hopkinson

This is a story of a girl who just could not stop playing baseball. As a girl, Alta Weiss discovered that she could really throw a baseball. Not only was she a pitcher for a girl, but she was a good pitcher for anyone. She found her way onto a team, and shows everyone just what she’s made for, and that’s playing baseball!

The Babe & I

by David A. Adler

Baseball during the depression was a way for folks to escape from the tough times and enjoy that national pastime. When times are tough for a little boy and his family, they do what they can to make ends meet. Not only does baseball come through for this little boy in a time of need, but Babe Ruth himself played a key role in helping out him and his family.

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