Archive for the ‘books’ Category

Edgar’s Second Word

January 28, 2015

Edgar's Second WordEdgar’s Second Word

By: Audrey Vernick

Illustrated by: Priscilla Burris

Hazel was soooo excited for her new baby brother. She planned on doing all sorts of fun things with him, especially reading. But when Edgar finally arrived, he wasn’t much different than her stuffed bunny Rodrigo! He didn’t talk, or move around much, so Hazel had to go back to waiting. One day (years later), Edgar finally said his first word! He said it with meaning! With conviction! “NO!” Surely that meant they could start playing all kinds of games? The problem was that Edgar’s first word was his only word. He said no to everything Hazel wanted to do. Still, Hazel was patient. When his second word finally comes, Hazel’s patience pays off.

Edgar’s Second Word is a great read for those who might be expecting a new sibling. It’s a sweet book full of love and well worth a read. The illustrations are simple, but colorful. You can’t help but love Hazel and little Edgar both.

Recommended for ages 4-7.

Nicole P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Kid Picks

January 25, 2015

mia and the big sister balletpenderwicks on gardam streetlego chima the right decisionpearl the cloud fairybig nate

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In My Heart: A Book of Feelings

January 23, 2015

 

You can’t help but notice the cover of this whimsical book, In My Heart: A Book of Feelings.  Die-cuts of hearts which decrease in size as you turn each page gives this book a unique appearance.  Each page is filled with a heart and expresses a young girl’s feelings.  The colorful illustrations just add to the charm of this book as the portrayal of each emotion is clearly visible.  Sometimes her heart feels like a balloon, as heavy as an elephant, tall as a plant or hidden away where no one can see.  Feelings can be communicated in so many different ways and so pick up this book with your young child and enjoy the many feelings we all try to understand.

This book can be enjoyed in a group situation as well as one on one with your special little one.

Beverly  (Davis)

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Malala: A Brave Girl from Pakistan/ Iqbal: A Brave Boy from Pakistan

January 21, 2015

malala/ iqbalMalala: A Brave Girl from Pakistan/ Iqbal: A Brave Boy from Pakistan
by Jeanette Winter

In Pakistan, the Taliban does not want girls to go to school. But Malala speaks out and says she has the right to education. Malala is attacked by the Taliban, but she survives and continues to spread her message around the world.

Iqbal, only four years old, must go to work in the carpet factory until his parents can repay a loan of twelve dollars. He cannot play or go to school. Instead, Iqbal spends his days locked in a factory with other children weaving carpets. When Iqbal learns that it is against the law to force children to work to repay debts, he spreads a message of freedom all over Pakistan, and as far as America.

This book includes two stories beautifully told and illustrated of two brave children who faced adversity but fought for what is right. Difficult topics are addressed, but in an age appropriate manner, and with an overarching message of hope, represented by an image of a kite that flows between the stories. Brief bios of Malala and Iqbal are included; quotes from the two children are worked into the stories and are featured in red text.

Highly recommended for ages 4 to 9.

(Jocelyn, Davis Library)

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Kid Picks

January 18, 2015

jack and jill 1winx 2 big nate 3neptune project 4stink 6jedi academy 7

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Boom Boom

January 16, 2015

Boom Boom CoverBoom Boom

By Sarvinder Naberhaus

Illustrated by Margaret Chodos-Irvine

 BOOM BOOM! FLASH! FLASH!  A classroom of multicultural preschool children listen and watch in awe during a spring thunderstorm. One little boy is frightened by the loud noise and holds his hands over his ears but is reassured by a little girl who takes his hand and leads him outside with the rest of the class to explore and splash in puddles after the storm.  We follow the class and the 2 new friends throughout the seasons as they find insects among the summer blossoms, crunch apples and jump in leaves in the fall, and finally catch snowflakes in the winter. Naberhaus employs one or two words in a rhyming pattern as the seasons progress and the children use their senses to interact with their environment.

Chodos-Irvine uses a variety of nontraditional materials and various printmaking techniques to lead viewers through the changing landscapes and the children’s accompanying activities. This is a unique and engaging exploration of the seasons for preschoolers as well as for early readers.

Reviewed by Connie (Parr Library)

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I’m a Dirty Dinosaur

January 15, 2015

I’m a Dirty Dinosaur by Janeen Brian & Ann James

This is an eye-catching book!  The title letters are in bright primary colored capitals on a white background, with the exception of the brown, finger-written word, “dirty.”

The text is a storyteller’s dream, with short refrains that rhyme, and repetitive choruses that beg for the listener to act them out.  This may become your child’s pre-bathtime favorite.  And of course, dinosaur lovers will be thrilled with a new book to read.

First published in Australia, I’m very glad that American readers will have a chance to enjoy I’m a Dirty Dinosaur.

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Strongheart

January 13, 2015

indexStrongheart
By Emily Arnold McCully

Strongheart is the true story of the world’s first movie star dog. He was a new breed of dog born in Germany during the World Wars, the German Shepard, used to help the police in apprehending criminals. When the war ended, Etzel von Oeringen was sent to America to be sold. Well trained and very determined, Etzel caught the eye of a movie director named Larry Trimble. The problem was, Etzel didn’t know how to be a dog! Before Larry could film Etzel for the movies, he had to teach his dog how to play.

When Etzel finally got in front of the cameras, he was incredible! He could look sad and happy and worried, something no other movie dog had done before. In all his films, Etzel was the hero, so Larry decided to start calling him Strongheart. This is a great book for any child who has an interest in dogs. They’ll learn some fun facts about the early years of the movie, and how a German Shepard became the very first movie star dog.

Recommended for ages 5-9.

Nicki P.

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Kid Picks

January 11, 2015

fancy nancy 1warthog 2dixie 3geronimo stilton 4fairy 5unfortunate events 6

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Albie’s First Word: A Tale Inspired by Albert Einstein’s Childhood

January 1, 2015

albie'sAlbie’s First Word : A Tale Inspired by Albert Einstein’s Childhood written by Jacqueline Tourville and illustrated by Wynne Evans.  When Albert Einstein was a young child, his parents worried because he didn’t talk.  His younger sister Maya chattered away but Albie said nothing.  He actively engaged in many activities and he observed but didn’t comment. According to the author’s note at the end of this title, Einstein has acknowledged his parents’ concern and the fact that they contacted a doctor. In this story the doctor makes several suggestions that he hopes will cause Albie to utter his first word but nothing works until Albie’s wonder at the universe inspires him. The illustrations include details that bring us back to the late 19th century of Einstein’s childhood, while also demonstrating that Albie is unique.  The image of preschooler Albie at a university lecture shows him standing on the chair as he focuses his gaze at the speaker. A great introduction to Albert Einstein.

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