Archive for the ‘books’ Category

Penguin Problems

November 30, 2016

penguin-problemsPenguin Problems
By Jory John
Illustrated by Lane Smith

Penguins. Cute and Cuddly. They waddle, they can’t fly, the all look alike. What could be better? To this little penguin, everything. I mean he waddles and looks silly when he does. He wants to fly, but he can’t. They all look alike and he looks like everyone else, repetitive but true. This penguin has problems, lots of them. In a very humorous tale, see the side of penguin life that is hard, really hard. Until a very nice walrus give him a little perspective. The mountains, the ocean, family and friends. All things the penguin can appreciate. But it is still cold and dark way too early.

By Ashley (Davis Library)

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The Forbidden Library

November 24, 2016

forbidden-libraryThe Forbidden Library

By Django Wexler

When I stumbled upon this book and saw the title, I had to read the cover summary:

“Alice always thought fairy tales had happy endings. That–along with everything else–changed after she met her first fairy hovering in the kitchen, threatening her father. The next day her father left, never to return.

Poor Alice dutifully goes off to live with an uncle she’s never heard of: a mysterious old man with an impossibly massive library full of books she’s forbidden to read. But when she runs into a talking cat who sneaks her inside and an arrogant boy who dares her to open a book, it’s hard to resist. The moment she reads the first line Alice finds herself INSIDE the book, with only one way out.

It seems Uncle Geryon is much more than he claimed to be. Good thing Alice is too, because she’ll need all her courage and wits to face the challenges to come.”

What library person could walk away from a story about magical books that LITERALLY take you to other worlds?  And talking cats are icing on the cake!  I really enjoyed Wexler’s unique book-based magical system.  “Readers” are the wielders of magic, seeking bits and pieces of magical fragments within their huge collection of books.  They then combined the found fragments to create magical books that can contain portals to other worlds and prisons for holding powerful magical creatures.

Alice is a smart, crafty girl who overcomes the many obstacles in her way by thinking outside the box.  There is a bit of mystery and intrigue as Alice comes to learn that people’s intentions are not always clear and most things are never simply black and white.  A few pictures are sprinkled throughout the book to help illustrate the unusual places and creatures Alice encounters during her adventure.

This book is part of a series which has two more books, The Mad Apprentice and the Palace of Glass, and a fourth expected sometime next year.

the-mad-apprentice the-palace-of-glass

I would recommend this middle grade novel for readers who enjoy magic, fantastical creatures, and strong female characters.

Reviewed by: Meredith (Harrington Library)

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Miles is a Mighty Brothersaurus

November 22, 2016

brotherMiles is a Mighty Brothersaurus

By Samantha Kurtzman-Counter and Abbie Schiller

If you have more than one child, you know that sometimes kids can compare themselves to their siblings. Maybe one is great at math, or sports, or science, but their younger (or older) sibling feels like they can’t be as impressive or successful. This Miles book addresses that problem and more. Miles is a middle child who loves dinosaurs. His older brother is great at baseball, winning trophy after trophy, while his younger brother is a gymnast. It leaves Miles feeling like he’s not any good at anything. With a little help from his loving grandpa, Miles learns that he has good qualities that are just as important as being good at sports.

If you struggle with a child that is going through something like this, then Miles can help them see it’s important to be yourself. This book is part of a bigger collection that focuses on “Helping Parents Raise Good People”. I expect to see more from this series in the future, but now you can find When Miles Got Mad and Miles is the Boss of His Body on the shelves at our library. Both discuss topics that can sometimes be difficult to approach, giving you a starting point for helping your child face problems.

Recommended for ages 4-7.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

Here are the other books in this award-winning series (click image to go to catalog):

mad

boss

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Everyone Loves Cupcake

November 18, 2016

Product DetailsEveryone Loves Cupcake

By:  Kelly DiPucchio

 

This hilarious follow-up to Ms. DiPucchio’s EVERYONE LOVES BACON is even funnier than the first story.  Cupcake dresses to impress.  Her smile is brilliant.  Her wave is flawless.  She even wears a tiara.  Cupcake alienates all of the other desserts in her quest to be perfect.  Then she crumbles and decides to show her true colors which endears her to everyone again.  The illustrations are almost as perfect as cupcake.  This is a very SWEET story!

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Kid Picks

November 13, 2016

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President Squid

November 11, 2016

Image result for president squid President Squid

By Aaron Reynolds

Illustrated by Sara Varon

We have a new president. Half of the grown-ups around are now ready to wait 4 years for a new one. The other half are excited to see what wonderful things their choice will make as the leader of our country. The kids of the US are wondering what is takes to be a president. In the book President Squid, he looks at what qualities he has that will make him the “greatest president ever” and the first giant squid president. President Squid tells you the important qualities a president should have. They should wear a tie, have the biggest house ever, be famous, do all the talking and be the BIG BOSS. As you go through the story you (and President Squid, too!) find out if he knows the right traits and if he is really ready to be president. With fun illustrations and lots of personality, this is a must read fun book.

Review by Ashley, Davis Library

 

 

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Lucy’s Lovey

November 4, 2016

 

Lucy’s Lovey

By Betsy Devany

Illustrated by Christopher Denise

Lucy had 17 baby dolls all with very distinctive names such as Sparkly Baby, Cry Baby, Burper Baby, Bubba Bea, Squeaky Baby and many more. But her favorite baby by far was Smelly Baby.  Why, you might ask, would she name her such a distasteful name?  Well, the reason was simple. When her grandmother gave her the baby and she first kissed it she said, “She smells like peppermint.” And so Smelly Baby was named!

As most favorite doll, Smelly Baby went everywhere and did everything with Lucy. In time, this resulted in her being truly representative of her name as she smelled less of peppermint and more of smellier things.  But Lucy didn’t care, she thought Smelly Baby was perfect!  Unfortunately, so did Lucy’s dog Stasher who had his own collection of stinky, stuffy toys all of which were covered with doggie drool.

How can Smelly Baby stay safe from a doggie kidnapping? And can a family actually bond over a child’s toy – smelly or not?

This charming tale of the love between a child and her favorite doll has found a special place in my heart. Christopher Denise’s full page illustrations with soft, expressive faces are particularly delightful.

I would highly recommend this to any preschooler whose best friend is their favorite toy.

Reviewed by Connie (Schimelpfenig Library)

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A Unicorn Named Sparkle

November 2, 2016

unicornA Unicorn Named Sparkle

By Amy Young

I’m sure we’ve all bought something and had certain expectations for it, only to be disappointed. Well, when Lucy buys a unicorn from an ad in a magazine, she’s already dreaming of a big, majestic creature that she can ride to school. All of her friends will be so jealous! When Sparkle finally arrives, he is not big, or majestic, and Lucy is pretty sure he has fleas. Despite her disappointment, Lucy tries to make the best of it. She plays dress up with her new unicorn, but he eats everything, including the tutu. He behaves poorly at show-and-tell (and he has gas, ewwwww). Lucy calls the unicorn delivery company to come pick him up, but finds that maybe, just maybe, this little unicorn isn’t so bad after all.

A great story about learning to see what’s under the surface, Sparkle the Unicorn will steal your heart just like he stole Lucy’s. If you give someone a chance to show their true colors, you might find that even a smelly goat can be the best unicorn friend.

Recommended for ages 3-7.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Kid Picks

October 30, 2016

movingday 11birthdays ibrokemytrunkalwaysabigailsparklespaanewclass

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They All Saw a Cat

October 24, 2016

cat1They All Saw a Cat by Brendan Wenzel

It’s all about perception in this picture book about a cat who “walked through the world, with its whiskers, ears and paws…” The cat is seen by a child, a fish, a dog and more.  Each creature views the cat through different eyes, whether it be blurry, big cat eyes for the fish, or a beast with long claws and sharp teeth by the mouse.  A bird views the cat from above, and a flea sees the cat as it nestles in its fur.  While the text is simple and repetitive, the varying perspectives of the illustrations tell the multi-faceted story of how one cat can be seen by so many in so many different ways!  With many wide, full-page spreads, this one would be fun to read with a child and talk about how and why each creature sees the cat so differently.

cat-2

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