Archive for the ‘reviews’ Category

Kid Picks

February 1, 2015

turkey totgerald mcboingpony named peanutellray jakebarbie mariposajunie b joneshenry and mudge

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Betty Goes Bananas

January 29, 2015

indexCAZUTHAMBetty Goes Bananas

by Steve Antony

Looking for a great book about temper tantrums? This just might be the one!

Betty the gorilla is hungry and wants to eat a banana. But when that banana just won’t open, well, Betty goes a little bit bananas! Luckily Mr. Toucan is there to help.

With bright, colorful pencil illustrations, this is a fun read-aloud about not always getting your way.

Be sure to check out Antony’s other picture book, Please, Mr. Panda, for more hilarious animal fun!

Reviewed by: Lara (Haggard Library)

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Edgar’s Second Word

January 28, 2015

Edgar's Second WordEdgar’s Second Word

By: Audrey Vernick

Illustrated by: Priscilla Burris

Hazel was soooo excited for her new baby brother. She planned on doing all sorts of fun things with him, especially reading. But when Edgar finally arrived, he wasn’t much different than her stuffed bunny Rodrigo! He didn’t talk, or move around much, so Hazel had to go back to waiting. One day (years later), Edgar finally said his first word! He said it with meaning! With conviction! “NO!” Surely that meant they could start playing all kinds of games? The problem was that Edgar’s first word was his only word. He said no to everything Hazel wanted to do. Still, Hazel was patient. When his second word finally comes, Hazel’s patience pays off.

Edgar’s Second Word is a great read for those who might be expecting a new sibling. It’s a sweet book full of love and well worth a read. The illustrations are simple, but colorful. You can’t help but love Hazel and little Edgar both.

Recommended for ages 4-7.

Nicole P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Play With Your Food

January 26, 2015

Play With Your Food

By David G. Derrick, Jr.

 Play with Your Food Cover
In Derrick’s newest book, he takes us to the Permian period, 299-250 million years ago, and gives us a different and quite hilarious version of survival of the fittest. The story begins with a gliding lizard trying to avoid being eaten by many predators. When he is finally caught by Dimetrodon, our lizard friend bargains that it is much better to play with your food than to eat it! Read on as the fun ensues while gliding lizard suggests many different games to convince Dimetrodon to play instead of eat him.

The artwork in this story is vivid, detailed and absolutely delightful. Be sure to look carefully as you read along – most of the pages have other interesting animals in the background, making the illustrations even more fun. I hope you and your little one enjoy this book as much as I did. Happy Reading!

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Kid Picks

January 25, 2015

mia and the big sister balletpenderwicks on gardam streetlego chima the right decisionpearl the cloud fairybig nate

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Malala: A Brave Girl from Pakistan/ Iqbal: A Brave Boy from Pakistan

January 21, 2015

malala/ iqbalMalala: A Brave Girl from Pakistan/ Iqbal: A Brave Boy from Pakistan
by Jeanette Winter

In Pakistan, the Taliban does not want girls to go to school. But Malala speaks out and says she has the right to education. Malala is attacked by the Taliban, but she survives and continues to spread her message around the world.

Iqbal, only four years old, must go to work in the carpet factory until his parents can repay a loan of twelve dollars. He cannot play or go to school. Instead, Iqbal spends his days locked in a factory with other children weaving carpets. When Iqbal learns that it is against the law to force children to work to repay debts, he spreads a message of freedom all over Pakistan, and as far as America.

This book includes two stories beautifully told and illustrated of two brave children who faced adversity but fought for what is right. Difficult topics are addressed, but in an age appropriate manner, and with an overarching message of hope, represented by an image of a kite that flows between the stories. Brief bios of Malala and Iqbal are included; quotes from the two children are worked into the stories and are featured in red text.

Highly recommended for ages 4 to 9.

(Jocelyn, Davis Library)

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Eva’s Treetop Festival

January 20, 2015

Eva's treetop festivalEva’s Treetop Festival

By: Rebecca Elliott

 

Eva Wingdale, an owl with lots of personality, is known for her big ideas. She offers to organize the first Treetop Owlementary Bloomtastic Festival with a bake-off, talent, fashion, and art shows. With the big event only seven days away, Eva is worried that she can’t get everything done in time. Her teacher, Mrs. Featherbottom, recommends that Eva ask her classmates for help. Eva decides that is the only way the festival will get planned in time.  She learns the power of delegation and her classmates willingly chip in to help her pull off a great festival.

 

This early chapter book is a nice step between early readers and chapter books. It is written in a diary format with speech bubbles and colorful illustrations. This book and other accessible early chapter books are published by the new Branches imprint of Scholastic Books. Both children and parents will love them. Other titles published by the Branches imprint include Boris on the Move, Kiki: My Stylish Life, and Monkey Me and the Pet Show.

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Kid Picks

January 18, 2015

jack and jill 1winx 2 big nate 3neptune project 4stink 6jedi academy 7

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App Time Recommends

January 17, 2015

Yesterday at App Time we explored the apps Pat the Bunny by Random House LCC and Felt Board by Software Smoothie.

Pat the Bunny ($4.99) is based on the book by Dorothy Kunhardt. It has the important feature of highlighted narration. Highlighted narration is similar to running your finger along text in a printed book. This feature helps kids gain print awareness. I really like that this app is true to the original printed book and that interaction is directly related to the text.

Felt Board ($2.99) is an open-ended, versatile app. This app looks exactly like a traditional felt board. Kids can create pictures with a variety of backgrounds, people, and animals. Encourage your child to talk about what is happening in the scenes they create. This interaction helps boost narrative skills. You can also use your imagination to create games to increase number, letter, and shape recognition. I love that the possibilities are endless with this app. If you need ideas, re-create a favorite flannel you’ve seen at storytime or ask us for ideas at the Children’s Info desk at your local Plano Public Library.

Interested in coming to App Time? It is every Friday, 11:00-11:45am, at Haggard Library (2501 Coit Road). Come join us as we explore how to best use apps as a tool for early literacy!

This program is funded by the Texas State Library and Archives Commission and the Institute for Museum and Library Services.

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Boom Boom

January 16, 2015

Boom Boom CoverBoom Boom

By Sarvinder Naberhaus

Illustrated by Margaret Chodos-Irvine

 BOOM BOOM! FLASH! FLASH!  A classroom of multicultural preschool children listen and watch in awe during a spring thunderstorm. One little boy is frightened by the loud noise and holds his hands over his ears but is reassured by a little girl who takes his hand and leads him outside with the rest of the class to explore and splash in puddles after the storm.  We follow the class and the 2 new friends throughout the seasons as they find insects among the summer blossoms, crunch apples and jump in leaves in the fall, and finally catch snowflakes in the winter. Naberhaus employs one or two words in a rhyming pattern as the seasons progress and the children use their senses to interact with their environment.

Chodos-Irvine uses a variety of nontraditional materials and various printmaking techniques to lead viewers through the changing landscapes and the children’s accompanying activities. This is a unique and engaging exploration of the seasons for preschoolers as well as for early readers.

Reviewed by Connie (Parr Library)

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