Archive for the ‘reviews’ Category

Little Tree

July 21, 2016

51Fg2ChjzMLLittle Tree

By Loren Long

In the middle of a little forest, there was a little tree. He had bright green leaves like all the other little trees, they kept him shaded and cool during the hot summer months. When fall came, all of the other trees dropped their leaves one at a time, but not the little tree. He held onto them tight. The next summer, all the other trees grew fresh green leaves. They got taller and bigger as the years went by, while the little tree clung to his brown, withered leaves and stayed the same. Can he learn to let go?

This story can be applied to so many situations. With it’s simple, colorful illustrations, it shows how holding onto something can keep you from growing up. Releasing that blanket or pacifier or raggedy toy might be easier with a little help from this little tree.

Recommended for ages 5-8.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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D is for Dress-Up: The ABC’s of What to Wear by Maria Carluccio

July 8, 2016

dressupD Is for Dress-Up: The ABC’s Of What we Wear by Maria Carluccio

It is hot outside and cool clothing may be on your mind.  This little book is a perfect solution for the summer heat.  Curl up on the couch in the air-conditioning and enjoy the alphabet as you talk about the clothes we wear.

Not all alphabet books are created equal.  They are best when they include uppercase and lowercase letters, plus corresponding words that make sense to children.  D is for Dress-up shows each uppercase letter, and prints a lower case word below the uppercase.  The choice of clothing items are mostly recognizable to children, along with one or two words that are great vocabulary expanders; E is for ensemble or V is for vintage.  The illustrations feature soft painted colors, diverse children and diverse activities.  This alphabet book is a winner!

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Red: the True Story of Red Riding Hood

July 7, 2016

Red: the True Story of Red Riding Hood

By Liesl Shurtliff

You might think you know the tale of Red Riding Hood but according to Liesl Shurtliff there is a lot more to the story.  Rose Red (who wears a magical red hood) is the young granddaughter of the Witch of the Woods (Granny).  Her grandmother has magical powers galore and can conjure up all types of magical spells.  Red has powers, too, but after a particularly disastrous spell backfires, she vows never to use magic again. Unfortunately Granny becomes deathly ill so to save her grandmother’s life Red sets off into the magic forest to find a cure.  Along the way Red meets Goldie (yes, the one with the golden locks) who becomes her sidekick and not always welcome companion.  There is, of course, a wolf but maybe he’s not quite as bad as you think he is.  Red’s encounters with a disgruntled dwarf, a Beast, pixies, bears, gnomes and enchanted items create nonstop action in this fairytale mash-up with unique twists and turns as Red continues the quest to help her grandmother.

Fans of fractured fairytales will gobble up this delightful book as familiar characters and subplots appear in the most unexpected places.  I would also recommend the author’s other books of this genre: Rump: the Story of Rumpelstiltskin and Jack: the Story of Jack and the Beanstalk).

Recommended for grades 4 – 6.

Reviewed by Connie (Schimelpfenig Library)

 

 

 

 

 

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The Sound of All Things

July 6, 2016

61Tqmms131LThe Sound of All Things

By Myron Uhlberg

Illustrated by Ted Papoulas

Have you ever tried to describe the sounds of a clacking, rushing roller coaster? Or how about the sounds a wave makes as it crashes on the sand? As a hearing child with two deaf parents, the boy in this book spends so much time trying to explain these things to his father. Sometimes he wants to tell his father no, that he doesn’t have the right words to describe a sound. It could be difficult at times to explain something that was so regular to his ears.

Set in 1930’s Brooklyn, this book has a rich historical element as well as a great perspective about people with disabilities. It’s easy to find inspiration in the boy’s decision to find more words to help describe the sounds of the world for his father. This is more than a slice of a different life, The Sound of All Things can help kids learn patience and kindness when interacting with people, disabled or not.

Recommended for ages 4-8.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Kid Picks

July 3, 2016

 

Magic tree housethe rain is painwe are in a book
sweat pea & FriendsThe case of the weeping witch

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A Dark, Dark Cave

June 29, 2016

darkcaveA Dark, Dark Cave by Eric Hoffman and illustrated by Corey R. Tabor

The illustrations of A Dark, Dark Cave feature a brother and older sister exploring a cave with their flashlights, only to reveal, (spoiler alert) they are just pretending, and being a bit loud in the process!  So, what should they do now?  You guessed.  Play another imaginary game.  Children love to use their imaginations, and this great little rhyming story is attuned to that.  Were you a child who liked to play under a blanket, placed under two chairs?

Harrington Library’s Family Place area has a “Hideaway Cube” which is covered with a blue netlike cloth.  Two or three children at a time fit under the net, and I’ve seen children in it playing, reading quietly, or “hiding.” It’s perfect for the imaginative child.  Come visit us today, and bring your imagination.

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Kid Picks

June 26, 2016

Who Let the Ghosts Out
Ratscalibur The Barftastic Life of Louie Burger
No Valentines for Katie Woo

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Cecil’s Pride

June 23, 2016

cecilWhen Cecil the lion was killed in 2015, the news made international headlines.  In Cecil’s Pride: The True Story of a Lion King, young readers learn more about Cecil and his extraordinary life before his death.

When Cecil was challenged by another male lion, and forced to abandon his territory, Cecil unexpectedly paired up with another male lion.  Male lions are fiercely protective of their prides and typically do not pair up, so this was highly unusual.  Cecil and Jericho, however, were stronger together. When Cecil was tragically killed by hunters, Cecil’s pride (especially the cubs) were in danger.  Amazingly, Jericho spared the cubs and adopted them into his own pride.

Young animal lovers (and budding conservationists) will pore over the quality photographs and enjoy the narrative of this unlikely friendship.  The author team is a father and his two daughters, and they’ve produced many photo biographies of true animal friendships.  Check out this one or another one by the Hatkoff’s.

cecil and jericho

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Grumpy Pants by Claire Messer

June 22, 2016

grumpypantsGrumpy Pants by Claire Messer

Are you and your toddler feeling hot, and bothered this summer?  A bit grumpy?  So is Penguin in Claire Messer’s book, Grumpy Pants.

Penguin is not really sure why he’s in a bad mood, so he tries stomping home, pulling off all of his grumpy clothes, bit by bit, until he counts to three and jumps in the bath.  Eventually, he feels better and goes to bed with a fresh attitude for tomorrow.  This is a perfect book to share with toddlers who are learning to manage their emotions.  It might even elicit a giggle as Penguin takes off his grumpy underpants.

Grumpy Pants is Claire Messer’s first picture book, and I’m looking forward to more from her!

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Kid Picks

June 19, 2016

Clifford's Tricks Even More Short and ShiveryCalling All Cars

 

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