Library Make: Two Little Blackbirds Finger Puppets (Literacy DIY)

April 7, 2015 by

Two Little Blackbirds finger puppets - early literacy DIY

Can nursery rhymes make your child a super reader?

Traditional nursery rhymes teach children valuable literacy skills, like the rhythm and rhyme of language as well as new vocabulary. Even better, experts have found that children who start kindergarten knowing eight or more nursery rhymes are often among the best readers of their class by age eight!

A fun way to learn a nursery rhymes is by using props, like these easy felt finger puppets for the nursery rhyme “Two Little Blackbirds”.  Watch the video below or read the instructions for this easy craft, then create your own blackbird finger puppets with our template.

TWO LITTLE BLACKBIRDS

Two little blackbirds sitting on a hill,
One named Jack and one named Jill.
Fly away Jack; fly away Jill.
Come back Jack; come back Jill.

More variations:

Sitting in the snow … Fast/Slow          Sitting on a gate … Early/Late
Sitting on a cloud … Soft/LOUD!           Sitting on the ice … Mean/Nice
Sitting on a lily … Serious/Silly           Sitting on a mop … Bottom/Top

Read the instructions and get the template and full rhyme here.

The template and rhyme alone are here.

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Early Literacy Tip of the Week

April 6, 2015 by

Children who have enjoyed their experiences at the public library often approach school with a positive attitude – ready and excited to learn. So bring your child to the library!

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Kid Picks

April 5, 2015 by

i survived 1patch 2close to famous 4cupcake diaries 5puppy place sweetie 6

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App Time Session 12: Trucks and Peekaboo Barn

April 4, 2015 by

byron barton appsIn App Time this week, we used the book app Trucks from the Byron Barton Collection #1 produced by Oceanhouse Media ($4.99 on the App Store or $1.99 if purchased individually).

For young listeners who love vehicles, this app is a great companion for the books of the same name. It features bold colors and simple navigation with a bright orange triangle at the bottom right for page turns. Sentences appear in black and are highlighted as read aloud (you can turn this option off, too). Pressing on a word will pronounce and display the word again. Sound effects are minimal: Pressing on objects in the scene results in identification of the object, and sometimes prompts additional sound effects. I like the non-distracting format of this app, ideal for younger children. Pressing the orange arrow at bottom center gives the option to close, go to home, navigate to particular pages, record your voice for read-aloud option and turn on/off sound effects.

peekaboo barnWe also used the activity app, Peekaboo Barn by Night & Day Studios ($1.99 on App Store and Google Play)

A wonderfully simple and pleasing app:  a red barn is front and center, and tapping on the wiggling doors opens them to reveal a farm animal. The animal noise is heard, and the word for the animal appears. Tapping again closes the barn doors, and the child can tap to open the doors and reveal another animal.

This one is great for interaction, animal identification and sounds.  Additionally, there are many language options, making this a good one for non-native English speakers or for those wanting their children to learn animal words in another language. 

peekaboo barn 1Parent options can be accessed by swiping, and allow play modes of regular or looped; voice on or off; voice in other languages; or the option to record a voice.

 

 

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Baby Sign Language – Bird

April 3, 2015 by

Babies develop motor skills before they develop the ability to speak. Teaching your baby sign language opens the door to communication, leading to more fun and less frustration!

Please join us for:

Babes in Arms – rhymes, music, movement, and sign language for children aged 0-9 months.

Rhyme Time – songs, nursery rhymes, books, and sign language for children aged 0-24 months.

See you at storytime!

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How Do Dinosaurs Stay Safe?

April 2, 2015 by

dinoHow Do Dinosaurs Stay Safe?

By Jane Yolen and Mark Teague

If you’re familiar with the How Do Dinosaurs series, you know that they cover a wide range of expected behaviors for kids. Yolen uses dinosaurs, a favorite for almost any child, to teach kids the best way to act and interact with their environment. In the newest book in the series, the dinosaurs show kids how to stay safe. The last few lines are my favorite. Dinosaur is “careful, not fearful. So here’s a big roar. Stay safe and play safe, little dinosaur.”

With open-ended questions all through the beginning of the book, How Do Dinosaurs Stay Safe? get the kids involved in answering with their ideas about staying safe. The humorous and colorful pictures of the dinos are engaging, while the ‘parents’ of the dinosaurs react in the backgrounds. If you look closely on each page, you’ll find the scientific names of all the dinosaurs pictured!

Recommended for ages 3-5.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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My Favorite Dogs

April 1, 2015 by

Dachshund by Jinny Johnson

This is one of eight titles in My Favorite Dogs series, which is new to the library.  I’m partial to the Dachshund, and this one features the most adorable face you’ve ever seen!  Many children in the library ask for the “dog books,” and I’ll be looking forward to showing them this new series.

dachshund

Harrington Library is looking forward to summer and a series of “Readers and Waggers” programs for young readers.  This fun program allows children a chance to read with a Heart of Texas therapy dog (and handler). Free tickets are available on a first come first served basis thirty minutes before the program.  Be watching for the dates in our summer event calendar coming in May!

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A Lullaby for Little One

March 31, 2015 by

lullA Lullaby for Little One

By Dawn Casey

Illustrated by Charles Fuge

This sweet story of a big daddy bunny and his baby bunny follows the pair all over their meadow as they play with friends. They hop and frolic and chase each other, playing hide and seek and peek-a-boo. At the end of the day, baby bunny gets a case of a sniffles when he gets tired. They say goodbye to their friends and big daddy bunny sings his little one a sweet lullaby.

Full of colorful, joyful illustrations, this story is a great bedtime treat for your little one. The rhyming text is soothing and predictable, allowing younger readers to become involved with guessing what could come next.

Recommended for ages 2-4.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Early Literacy Tip of the Week

March 30, 2015 by

The more you talk to your child, the richer your child’s vocabulary will be. Talk throughout the day. Have conversations all the time.

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Kid Picks

March 29, 2015 by

A to Z mysteries 1shiloh 2it's halloween 3mummies in the morning 4sticks 5just grace 6

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