Lucy’s Lovey

November 4, 2016 by

 

Lucy’s Lovey

By Betsy Devany

Illustrated by Christopher Denise

Lucy had 17 baby dolls all with very distinctive names such as Sparkly Baby, Cry Baby, Burper Baby, Bubba Bea, Squeaky Baby and many more. But her favorite baby by far was Smelly Baby.  Why, you might ask, would she name her such a distasteful name?  Well, the reason was simple. When her grandmother gave her the baby and she first kissed it she said, “She smells like peppermint.” And so Smelly Baby was named!

As most favorite doll, Smelly Baby went everywhere and did everything with Lucy. In time, this resulted in her being truly representative of her name as she smelled less of peppermint and more of smellier things.  But Lucy didn’t care, she thought Smelly Baby was perfect!  Unfortunately, so did Lucy’s dog Stasher who had his own collection of stinky, stuffy toys all of which were covered with doggie drool.

How can Smelly Baby stay safe from a doggie kidnapping? And can a family actually bond over a child’s toy – smelly or not?

This charming tale of the love between a child and her favorite doll has found a special place in my heart. Christopher Denise’s full page illustrations with soft, expressive faces are particularly delightful.

I would highly recommend this to any preschooler whose best friend is their favorite toy.

Reviewed by Connie (Schimelpfenig Library)

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Baby Sign Language – Go

November 4, 2016 by

Babies develop motor skills before they develop the ability to speak. Teaching your baby sign language opens the door to communication, leading to more fun and less frustration!

Please join us for:

Babes in Arms – rhymes, music, movement, and sign language for children aged 0-9 months.

Rhyme Time – songs, nursery rhymes, books, and sign language for children aged 0-24 months.

See you in storytime!

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A Unicorn Named Sparkle

November 2, 2016 by

unicornA Unicorn Named Sparkle

By Amy Young

I’m sure we’ve all bought something and had certain expectations for it, only to be disappointed. Well, when Lucy buys a unicorn from an ad in a magazine, she’s already dreaming of a big, majestic creature that she can ride to school. All of her friends will be so jealous! When Sparkle finally arrives, he is not big, or majestic, and Lucy is pretty sure he has fleas. Despite her disappointment, Lucy tries to make the best of it. She plays dress up with her new unicorn, but he eats everything, including the tutu. He behaves poorly at show-and-tell (and he has gas, ewwwww). Lucy calls the unicorn delivery company to come pick him up, but finds that maybe, just maybe, this little unicorn isn’t so bad after all.

A great story about learning to see what’s under the surface, Sparkle the Unicorn will steal your heart just like he stole Lucy’s. If you give someone a chance to show their true colors, you might find that even a smelly goat can be the best unicorn friend.

Recommended for ages 3-7.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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DIY Literacy Game: Name Turkey (LIBRARY MAKE)

November 1, 2016 by

DIY Literacy Game: Name Turkey (LIBRARY MAKE)

Happy Thanksgiving!

Learning how to spell your name is essential and is a great way to practice early literacy skills.  Even if your child is not yet ready to write, recognition of letters and the sounds they make is still very important. This name turkey craft helps your child break down their name letter by letter and incorporates fine motor skills to get your child really involved in the process.

Watch the video below to learn how to make your own name turkey while getting into the spirit of fall.  You can also read the instructions and print the craft template with these printable instruction sheets.

Printable instructions and templates here.

Thanks for checking out this tutorial!  Click the picture below for more Library Make tutorials, and don’t forget to share and like our video above or on YouTube.  Happy making!

LM click for more blog banner

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Kid Picks

October 30, 2016 by

movingday 11birthdays ibrokemytrunkalwaysabigailsparklespaanewclass

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October 27, 2016 by

King Baby

By Kate Beaton

 

This fantastically hilarious new book by Beaton tells the tale of King Baby, demanding ruler of his loyal subjects (his parents) as they struggle to meet his needs.  The illustrations are fabulous (look at the exhausted expressions on the subjects’ faces) and parents will relate to the truth in this humor as King Baby gurgles his demands and his parents try to decipher his wants and needs.  And the ending is spectacular!  That’s all I’m saying to avoid spoilers for the parents.  Preschoolers will love this book, but honestly I think parents will enjoy it even more. It’s just so relatable! So funny! So adorable!  So, please – READ THIS BOOK!!  Happy reading!

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They All Saw a Cat

October 24, 2016 by

cat1They All Saw a Cat by Brendan Wenzel

It’s all about perception in this picture book about a cat who “walked through the world, with its whiskers, ears and paws…” The cat is seen by a child, a fish, a dog and more.  Each creature views the cat through different eyes, whether it be blurry, big cat eyes for the fish, or a beast with long claws and sharp teeth by the mouse.  A bird views the cat from above, and a flea sees the cat as it nestles in its fur.  While the text is simple and repetitive, the varying perspectives of the illustrations tell the multi-faceted story of how one cat can be seen by so many in so many different ways!  With many wide, full-page spreads, this one would be fun to read with a child and talk about how and why each creature sees the cat so differently.

cat-2

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Art Time With Lois Ehlert

October 21, 2016 by

Leaf-Man-COVERLooking for something to do on a lazy weekday? It’s time for some fall crafts! You could start off your craft day reading books like Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf and Leaf Man, which are artfully illustrated with photographs of real leaves and objects. If you’ve never read a book by Lois Ehlert, you’re in for a treat! Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf follows the growth of a maple tree from the time the seed lands on the ground all the way through to a full grown tree with big, beautiful leaves that turn colors in the fall. Where Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf teaches about trees, Leaf Man is bursting with creative things you can do with the leaves! The leaves start their journey as a leaf man, but turn into all sorts of different animals and objects with a little imagination!

So, what’s next? Now it’s time to go on a walk and gather as many leaves, acorns, and bits of nature that you can! Bring back your goodies and lay them out on some paper. This could be an exercise in process art (which focuses more on the play and process than the finished product) or you can aim to replicate one of the fun pictures you found in your books! If you’re strapped for ideas, come into the library to pick up one of our many craft books.

The most important thing to remember is to have fun! Let your children’s imaginations run wild with their projects and you might end up creating something that represents fall in the best way.

Here are a few craft ideas to get you started:

Leaf Rubbings

Leaf Impressions

Hedgehog Hibernation Basket

Owl Mask

Happy crafting!

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Walter’s Wonderful Web

October 18, 2016 by

walterWalter’s Wonderful Web by Tim Hopgood

Walter, a fuzzy looking spider, wants to make a perfect web, but all of his webs are “wibby-wobbly.”  As he tries to perfect his web, he creates different shapes, which each get blown away by the wind.  Finally, he creates a web which combines all of the shapes, and as it glows in the moonlight it is wonderful!

Not only is this little story full of great alliterative w’s, it’s a great participatory book to read to a group of children.  Hopgood uses a repetitive phrase, “Whoosh, went the wind,” which the children will love to say as they sweep their arms in a whooshing motion.  (Be sure to encourage the motion, and the next time you lift your arm, they’ll know exactly when to chime in.)  Another way to encourage participation occurs at each page turn.  A slight pause gives the children time to announce the shape as you reveal it.  I hope you’ll enjoy sharing this story, whether you read it to one or many children!

 

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Kid Picks

October 16, 2016 by

dinosaur-hunt mostly-ghostly
lady-gagaunlike-other-monstersgirl-to-girl

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