Baby Sign Language – Dirty

September 2, 2016 by

Babies develop motor skills before they develop the ability to speak. Teaching your baby sign language opens the door to communication, leading to more fun and less frustration!

Please join us for:

Babes in Arms – rhymes, music, movement, and sign language for children aged 0-9 months.

Rhyme Time – songs, nursery rhymes, books, and sign language for children aged 0-24 months.

See you in storytime!

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1,000 Books!

September 1, 2016 by

1000 booksPlano Public Library is joining with 1000 Books Before Kindergarten to encourage parents and caregivers to read aloud to newborns, infants and/or toddlers.  Reading regularly to your preschooler helps prepare them for success in kindergarten.

The early literacy goal:  Read 1,000 books before your child starts kindergarten!  (If you read just one book a night, you will have read 365 books in a year…that’s 1,095 books in 3 years!)

Pick up a reading log at any Plano library, track online using the 1000 Books Before Kindergarten app, or do what works best for you.  For every 100 books read, come to the library for a sticker and take a milestone photo.  Once you reach 1,000 books, you’ll receive a certificate and free book!

To kick off the program, we’ll be holding special storytimes TODAY, September 1, 2016 at all five locations!  Join us for some fun read-alouds, and log your first books toward your reading goal.

The schedule is:

Parr Library @10:00am

Schimelpfenig Library @11:30am

Harrington Library @12pm

Davis Library @2pm

Haggard Library @7pm

 

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John, Paul, George & Ben

August 31, 2016 by

August Kid Brain PictureJohn, Paul, George and Ben

By Lane Smith

The story of 5 lads who were fiercely independent and took the liberty to always be themselves. John Hancock as a little boy always a bold one. Paul Revere, a noisy lad. George Washington, the honest one. Ben Franklin, with a quick wit and a clever turn of a phrase, always had something to say. Tom (Thomas) Jefferson, independent. With Lane Smith’s creative and humorous writing, this story gives an insight to history on a level that children can relate (and parents will love). See how the personalities of these 5 boys grew into men who turned a territory of England into a country of its own.

Reviewed by Ashley (Davis Library)

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Hoodoo by Ronald L. Smith

August 30, 2016 by

hoodooHoodoo by Ronald L. Smith

Looking for a page turner?  I picked up Hoodoo, because I heard it would keep you on the edge of your seat.  Set in 1930’s Alabama, Hoodoo Hatcher, twelve, needs to learn to conjure to defeat the “Stranger,” threatening the town with black magic.  Be sure to know your reader, because this story might be too scary.  But it’s perfect for those who like a bit of a shiver.  After all, Halloween is just two months away!

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Still a Gorilla

August 26, 2016 by

Still a Gorilla!

By Kim Norman

Willy is a gorilla at the zoo, but he wants to be a different animal.  No matter how hard he tries to look or act like other animals, he is still a gorilla! This picture book is super fun and silly.  The large, bold and colorful illustrations are very eye-catching.  This is a wonderful book for storytime or for a preschool classroom, as well as for sharing one-on-one with your child.  There are many opportunities for kids to join in the read-aloud fun each time that Willy is ‘STILL A GORILLA!’  I hope you enjoy this one as much as I did.  Happy reading!

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Miss Mary Reporting: The True Story of Sportswriter Mary Garber

August 23, 2016 by

missmarycatalogMiss Mary Reporting written by Sue Macy and illustrated by C. F. Payne.

As a child, Mary Garber played football with the boys and attended sporting events with her father.  She also loved to read about sports so she was a natural to be a sportswriter as an adult. It wasn’t that simple though, since Mary lived during a time when women didn’t usually have the opportunity to become sportswriters.

At first Mary accepted a job as a society reporter just to start working on a newspaper but she didn’t have any interest in writing about parties and fashion. During World War II, many of the male sportswriters became soldiers so Mary was given a chance to write about sporting events.  During her sports-writing career, she covered various teams from local to professional sports. Mary wrote regularly for the Winston-Salem Journal  newspaper until she was 86 years old.

Although it was often a challenge to be a woman sportswriter, Mary loved her job.  She covered baseball when Jackie Robinson became the first black player to join the major leagues and “was inspired by his quiet dignity”.   Many lively anecdotes and energetic images convey Mary’s inspirational story in this picture book biography.

Recommended for children in grades 2-4.

Reviewed by Donna (Library Technical Services)

 

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I Am Pusheen the Cat

August 12, 2016 by

pusheenI Am Pusheen the Cat

By: Claire Belton

There is no doubt you have come across Pusheen at some point, whether it is the local comics bookstore, or as a meme on Facebook and Tumblr. Pusheen is the delightfully plump gray cat with a naughty streak. This book is a collection of stories and comics that have been seen in social media, but are now in one handy book. Tips for cats, their owners, and other random tidbits. While there is not a large amount of substance in this collection, it is an enjoyable quick read for elementary age children, and quite possibly the teens and adults in their lives.

Recommended for those who love cats, memes, and silly comics.

Meow.

Review by: Diana (Schimelpfenig Library)

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Alpha, Bravo, Charlie

August 11, 2016 by

Alpha, Bravo, Alpha Bravo CharlieCharlie: The Complete Book of Nautical Codes

By Sara Gillingham

Have you ever wondered what all those colorful flags on ships are for?  Well it turns out, as I learned from this maritime book, each flag not only has a meaning but a letter associated with it. For each of the twenty-six alphabet flags, from alpha to zulu, a full-page illustration, front and back, is provided along with the meaning and a short description of how it is used by sailors.  Other nautical codes associated with each letter are provided including the phonetic words, Morse code, and semaphore (flag waving).  Each letter also features an illustration and description of different types of boats.

The introduction and descriptions in this book are informative without being overwhelming.  The simplistic illustrations are bright and colorful giving the whole book a playful feel.  The flag pages have a linen-like texture that brings a tactile element to the book.  A glossary of nautical words is included in the back of the book along with websites for additional information about nautical history, boats, codes, and decorating with flags in case this book only serves to “wet” your appetite for all things salty and sea-worthy.

After reading this book, don’t be surprised if you find yourself tapping out messages in Morse code or decorating you room with flags that spell out your initials… I know I sure did!

signal flags

Review by: Meredith (Harrington Library)

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The Perfect Dog

August 9, 2016 by

The Perfect Dog

By Kevin O’Malley

What kind of dog is “the perfect dog”?   One little girl thinks she knows the answer to this question until she starts looking at all of the different types of breeds with their varying characteristics. To make her decision, this little girl decides that she will compare the different breeds. At first her dog should be “big…” (Chow Chow), then “bigger…” (German Shepherd), then “biggest…” (Saint Bernard…) and finally “Maybe not this big!” (Great Dane).  After that she looks for dogs that are small, snuggly, fancy, fast, long-haired and happy with all of the extremes of each similarly displayed in cartoon-like drawings of lovably humorous dogs with very distinct personalities. Playful chaos takes over as each specific trait reaches its extreme with “maybe not…” until finally girl and dog are united…perfectly!

The dogs are the true stars of this book which just happens to teach a fun-filled lesson on comparisons and superlatives with wit and charm.  A perfect picture book for dog lovers everywhere!  (Don’t miss the endpapers displaying the various breeds in the story!)

Reviewed by Connie (Schimelpfenig Library)

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Kid Picks

August 7, 2016 by

the chicken squad

dance team dilemma the rainbow fish The Vampire Dare
My day in the forestThe notebook of doom

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