Posts Tagged ‘Children’s easy book’

Clothesline Clues to Sports People Play

February 10, 2016

clotheslinecluessportsClothesline Clues to Sports People Play

By: Kathryn Heling and Deborah Hembrook

Illustrated by: Andy Robert Davies

This is a fun follow-up to the book Clothesline Clues to Jobs People Do by the same authors and illustrator. It also seems fitting to have a sports themed book with the upcoming summer Olympics. The book is set up with a rhyme about a type of sport with corresponding items on a clothesline. Readers get to guess the sport and find out if they are right on the next page. Additionally, readers can look for a mischievous squirrel that appears on multiple pages throughout.

One thing that is appreciated in this book (as with the previous one) is that men, women, and diverse skin tones are all portrayed playing the different sports. Finally, the story concludes with a question for readers: “what sport would you like to try out today?” This participatory picture book is recommended for ages 3 and up.

Reviewed by: Diana (Harrington Library)

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Freedom in Congo Square

February 3, 2016

congoFreedom in Congo Square

By Carole Boston Weatherford

Illustrated by R. Gregory Christie

New Orleans has a history of music and dance dating all the way back to colonial times. These two Coretta Scott King honorees set out to tell the story of Congo Square, a place that served as a refuge for enslaved and free African Americans alike. During this time, there was a law stating that Sunday must be a day of rest, so for half a day a week the slaves of New Orleans gathered in Congo Square. This was where they could sing and dance and forget their oppression for a little while.

Freedom in Congo Square tells of people’s capacity to find hope and joy even under the most difficult circumstances. Through bright, vivid paintings and simple language, this story can start a conversation on a much deeper subject. Consider pairing this with other books like Ellen’s Broom and I, Too, am America as a story time for Black History Month.

Recommended for ages 4-8.

Nicole P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Cockatoo, Too

January 26, 2016

cockatooCockatoo, Too

By Bethanie Deeney Murguia

Every struggle with the difference between two, too, and to? I know I have! In this delightful and colorful book, a cockatoo explores all the different forms of the word. The text is simple, but helps the reader better understand how two cockatoos are different than cockatoos, too! By the time the tutus and the toucans show up, you’ll be giggling as you try to say these short tongue twisters!

As the two cockatoos in tutus and the two cockatoos in tutus, too start to can-can with the toucans, you’ll agree with the tiny bird at the end of the book. It’s all “too, too much!” A fun book that introduces the reader to word play, as well as  helps introduce the idea of two, too, and to!

Recommended for ages 3-6

Nicole P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Snap!

January 16, 2016

Imagination is the key word for this new book by Hazel Hutchins.  Who doesn’t enjoy a brand new box of crayons and Evan just opened his box all shiny and new. He is coloring when Snap! his crayon breaks into two pieces.  Evan isn’t upset since his one crayon turned into two crayons.  What fun he can have with two crayons and when many of crayons Snap! he has doubles and even triples of different colored crayons.  With crayons galore Evan continues to color and  discovers that with tiny bits of crayons he can make furry spots.  When some of the crayons lose their wrappers Evan tries to  tape them and glue them.  Without wrappers he discovers that he can crayon sideways and surprising things begin to appear.  But Evan’s crayons are disappearing right before his very eyes?  Does Evan get upset, no, Evan uses his imagination once again and discovers a new adventure.

What a fun book to sit and enjoy with your little ones or even in a group situation.  I enjoyed reading a book about children using their imaginations to find new solutions to their problems as small as they might seem.

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Such a Little Mouse

December 22, 2015

mouseSuch a Little Mouse

By Alice Schertle

Illustrated by Stephanie Yue

Share little mouse’s adventures through the year as he explores his world during spring, summer, fall, and winter. He meets new creatures with every outing, making new friends as he looks for food. Every day he brings a little something home. Sometimes it’s nuts or seeds, sometimes a nice bit of watercress. Each piece goes way down deep in his burrow so he’s ready for winter. And with each new season comes a page of repeated words that you and your little one can say together. “One, Two, Three! Such a little mouse. Off he goes into the wide world.”

This cute book teaches readers a lot about the world. As you follow little mouse’s adventures, you’ll see what happens to an area during different seasons, and what kind of animals are active during each part of the years. It also teaches how animals store food for the winter (though they probably don’t have the great reading material this little mouse has at home).

Recommended for ages 3-5.

Nicole P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Brave as can be: a book of courage

December 19, 2015

by Jo Witek

Along with Hello in there!:  a big sister’s book of waiting and In my heart:  a book of feelings we can enjoy another of Jo Witek books. Brave as can be: a book of courage is not only educational but is filled with whimsical, child like illustrations.  The peek a boo openings on each page just add to the enjoyment of the book and will engage children of all ages.  We are introduced to a young girl remembering her fears when she was small.  Fears that were as big as a mountain like storms, barking dogs, dark night and especially bad dreams.  She inspires us with her courage as she learns to combat these fears through singing, using her imaginations as well as learning to enjoy things that are a bit scary.  Her bravery in defeating her fears will provide an opportunity for parents or any adult to discuss this emotion and their child or children.  Jo Witek definitely has a talent in dealing with emotional issues and in helping us teach the younger generation.

Beverly (Davis)

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The Snow Rabbit

December 15, 2015

51ulJQet78L._SX372_BO1,204,203,200_The Snow Rabbit by Camille Garoche

Two sisters look longingly through their window at the snowy sky. One goes out and sculpts a little rabbit, but when she brings it back inside to her wheelchair-bound sister, it begins to melt. So they take it outside and into the forest where enchanted things begin to happen.

This beautiful, wordless, quietly magical book is a follow-up to Garoche’s gorgeous Fox’s Garden and features more of her stunning paper cut illustrations. Full of warmth and compassion, despite the cold, snowy scenery, this story is perfect for the winter season, and opens the door for conversations about imagination, vulnerability, kindness, and love.

1108-BKS-NEAL2-facebookJumbo-v2

Reviewed by: Lara (Haggard Library)

 

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Sona and the Wedding Game

December 8, 2015

weddingSona and the Wedding Game

By Kashmira Sheth

Illustrated by Yoshiko Jaeggi

Sona’s big sister is getting married and there is a tradition in Indian weddings that the bride’s younger sibling should steal the groom’s shoes during the ceremony. This task falls to Sona, who is determined to come up with a good plan. If she succeeds, the groom will have to bargain with her to get them back. The game is not as easy as it seems, as the groom’s brother will be guarding the shoes! Sona images all the different things she can ask for in exchange for the shoes, before finally settling on the best treat of all!

A wonderful peek into a rich culture, Sona and the Wedding Game is a delight to read. The watercolor illustrations are detailed and beautiful, full of the bright colors of Indian culture. Sona’s imaginative spirit will engage any reader as she plans her wild heist of the groom’s shoes. There’s an informative section in the back of the book about the Hindu religion and different types of Indian weddings.

Recommended for ages 5-8.

Nicole P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Rodeo Red

November 28, 2015

redRodeo Red

By Maripat Perkins

Illustrated by Molly Idle

Yeehaw! Get your cowboy boots on, because Rodeo Red is one fast ropin’, hound dog lovin’ gal. She and her dog Rusty have been closer than two buttons on a new shirt for as long as she can remember. One day Sideswiping Jim shows up and Red knows he’s going to be a heap of trouble. The Sheriff and Deputy (aka, Mom and Dad) tell her she’s got to get along with her new little brother, but Slim crosses the line when he steals Rusty! Red tries to sneak into his camp to get back her favorite dog, but runs into all kinds of trouble! Can Red come up with a plan to help free Rusty from Swideswiping Jim?

Cowboy themed from top to bottom, this fun family story shows just what it’s like to deal with a new sibling. There can be a lot of crying, and sometimes some jealousy, but Red’s ingenuity brings peace in the end. The cowboy slang of the narrative is sometimes at odds with the pictures, which show a regular family with a little girl who simply LOVES the wild west (and her dog). It’ll be sure to bring giggles from any reader.

Recommended for ages 5-8.

Nicole P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Seaver the Weaver

November 10, 2015

weaverSeaver the Weaver

By Paul Czajak

Illustrated by The Brothers Hilts

Seaver isn’t like his brothers and sisters. They’re orb spiders and they only spin in perfect circles. All of the little spiders spin their webs each night, but Seaver looks up at the stars and finds inspiration. Instead of the smooth circles of his siblings’ webs, Seaver weaves squares and triangles and hexagons! His webs catch many bugs, but his siblings keep telling him that it’s not right for him to weave other shapes. Finally, he builds a web so beautiful that even his siblings can’t deny that other shapes are the way to go!

Seaver the Weaver is a sweet story about being true to yourself no matter what. The illustrations make the spiders friendly and humorous, rather than scary (I’m not a fan of scary spiders!). With all the different shapes in the web, you and your little one can expand shape vocabulary together, as well as learn a thing or two about spiders.

Recommended for ages 2-6

Nicole P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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