Posts Tagged ‘Children’s easy book’

Next to You

September 27, 2016

nextNext to You: A Book of Adorableness

By Lori Haskins Houran

Illustrated by Sydney Hanson

What could be cuter than a basket of baby chicks? Or a bunny, the kind with the little round fluffy tail? How about a baby elephant taking a bath? Why, it’s you! Of course! When it comes to new babies, friends, or other special people in your life, it’s very important to let them know just how adorable they are. This small book is FULL of adorableness, from little ducklings to baby tigers. With a little bit of comedy thrown in, Next to You can give some great ideas of how to tell someone you love how much they mean to you. If you can resist the big-eyed baby animals on the front cover, then you’re a stronger person than me!

Recommended for ages 5-8.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Hammer and Nails

September 13, 2016

daddyHammer and Nails

By Josh Bledsoe

Illustrated by Jessica Warrick

I’m a daddy’s girl and nothing excites me more than seeing great daddy/daughter stories that show a dad can have an amazing relationship with his daughter. In Hammer and Nails, Darcy thinks her day is ruined when her best friend gets sick and can’t make it to their playdate. She had a whole list of fun things to do, but she crumples it up. When her daddy overhears her grumbling, he makes her a deal. If they can do one thing off his to-do list, then they can do one off of hers. What follows is an adorable mashup of daddy’s chores and Darcy’s playdate plans.

Hammer and Nails is a charming story about trying things for the first time and might inspire kids and adults both to find the fun in chores. The characters are so expressive, especially faced with that ONE thing that they’re not sure about. I would recommend this story to anyone, daddies, daughters, mothers, and sons.  As the daddy in this book puts it “Sometimes things you’ve never done end up being fun! Try it.”

Recommended for ages 5-7.

Nicki Paris

Schimelpfenig Library

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HARE AND TORTOISE

July 22, 2016

Many of us have enjoyed reading the classic Aesop’s fable, Hare and Tortoise.  Alison Murray has created a new version of this classic that is a delight to read.  Right from the start the reader is involved, we get to stop the Hare and  Tortoise and learn about their characteristics and personality traits.  The race begins as predicted with the energetic over-confident Hare and the ever steady Tortoise racing to see who will get to the finish line first.  There is no mystery to this fable since we are aware the Tortoise always wins the race with his diligence and patience.  We can, however, enjoy a bit of humor and creativity in every page with the colorful and large illustrations than are easy for children to interpret.

Review: Bev (Davis)

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Little Tree

July 21, 2016

51Fg2ChjzMLLittle Tree

By Loren Long

In the middle of a little forest, there was a little tree. He had bright green leaves like all the other little trees, they kept him shaded and cool during the hot summer months. When fall came, all of the other trees dropped their leaves one at a time, but not the little tree. He held onto them tight. The next summer, all the other trees grew fresh green leaves. They got taller and bigger as the years went by, while the little tree clung to his brown, withered leaves and stayed the same. Can he learn to let go?

This story can be applied to so many situations. With it’s simple, colorful illustrations, it shows how holding onto something can keep you from growing up. Releasing that blanket or pacifier or raggedy toy might be easier with a little help from this little tree.

Recommended for ages 5-8.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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The Sound of All Things

July 6, 2016

61Tqmms131LThe Sound of All Things

By Myron Uhlberg

Illustrated by Ted Papoulas

Have you ever tried to describe the sounds of a clacking, rushing roller coaster? Or how about the sounds a wave makes as it crashes on the sand? As a hearing child with two deaf parents, the boy in this book spends so much time trying to explain these things to his father. Sometimes he wants to tell his father no, that he doesn’t have the right words to describe a sound. It could be difficult at times to explain something that was so regular to his ears.

Set in 1930’s Brooklyn, this book has a rich historical element as well as a great perspective about people with disabilities. It’s easy to find inspiration in the boy’s decision to find more words to help describe the sounds of the world for his father. This is more than a slice of a different life, The Sound of All Things can help kids learn patience and kindness when interacting with people, disabled or not.

Recommended for ages 4-8.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Rain Fish

June 25, 2016

I have enjoyed so many of Lois Ehlert’s children’s books so when I saw her new book, Rain Fish, I couldn’t wait to take a peek.  Once again her creativity and inventive ideas transform this book into an art project that can be enjoyed by any parent or child.  By using recycled materials and clever rhyming words Lois Ehlert turns another book into a treasure to be enjoyed by everyone.

I’d give it:  5 stars

4stars

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Hector and Hummingbird

June 21, 2016

Hector and HummingbirdHector and Hummingbird

By: Nicholas John Frith

Hector is a bear with a big problem. His best friend, a tiny hummingbird, is so NOISY!! If that isn’t bad enough, Hummingbird copies Hector too.

Hey Hector!

            Are you scratching?

            I’m going to scratch too!

            Look! I’m the best scratcher, aren’t I?

            Hector?

            Hec-torrr??

This story made me laugh out loud. Kids will be able to relate to Hummingbird while parents might relate with Hector. The brilliant, bright illustrations are the perfect complement to the story. A real winner!

Renee (Parr library)

 

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Chicken Lily

May 26, 2016

61nI7EPEwLLChicken Lily

By Lori Mortensen

Illustrated by Nina Victor Crittenden

For Chicken Lily, it’s not easy to take risks. She won’t take off her training wheels, or raise her wing in class. She might not be brave, but she’s good at so many other things. Being a careful colorer, and a patient puzzler couldn’t help her with the school’s poetry contest. She would have to get up on a stage and read a poem aloud in front of the whole school! Nothing could be more terrifying than that!

Chicken Lily proves that being scared is something anyone can face with a little support from friends. It’s okay to be scared sometimes. This is a great lesson to share with your little ones, whether they have a current fear, or whether they’re just a little nervous about something. Just like Chicken Lily, they too can face that microphone and take a step over their fears, even if it’s just for one day.

Recommended for ages 4-8.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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The Very Cold, Freezing, No-Number Day

May 25, 2016

by Ashley N. Sorenson

If you’re looking for a book to help your child with their counting skills, you will love this new book.  The Very Cold, Freezing, No-Number Day.  Not only will this book keep your children’s attention, but your child can trace the numbers, blow on the numbers, count them and unfreeze them.  They will also learn about the different seasons, talk about colors and patterns.  What a great book to enjoy one on one with your little one or in a small group setting.  The clever illustrations just add to the qualtiy of this interactive and entertaining book.

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My New Mom and Me

May 13, 2016

51HkVEbXwrLMy New Mom and Me

by Renata Galindo

While it might not be a conversation you think about often, children should understand adoption. They might encounter adopted children in their school, or happen to be one themselves. My New Mom and Me is a gentle way to introduce your child to this concept.

Told from the prospective of the child, it brings up many of the concerns adopted children may feel, including the fact that they don’t look like their adoptive parent. While things aren’t always perfect between the new cat mother and her adopted puppy, they show how much love and patience can come out of the new living arrangements. Though they might not start off as a family, they learn how to become one.

Recommended for ages 3-7.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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