Posts Tagged ‘Children’s easy book’

Hey Duck and Just a Duck!

April 16, 2015

I couldn’t resist writing about these two books written and illustrated by Carin Bramsen,  Hey Duck and Just a Duck! The  illustrations are large and  beautiful and so realistic you just want to reach out and touch each fuzzy animal.  Speaking of animals we meet duck and cat.  Duck is an extremely friendly fellow and he is sure he has found a new friend, another duck.  He keeps asking the duck why is tail is so long?  Why doesn’t he like to swim in water?  Why doesn’t he quack?  You might be able to guess that his new friend is a cat.  Cat gets quite annoyed at this pesky duck but eventually responds to duck, “My sense of ME has gone AMUCK!” and begins to quack just like duck.  They form a bond through this adventure and their friendship is sealed.

 

Just a Duck? the sequel begins with duck deciding to become a cat.  Even though both cat and duck realize he looks nothing like a cat, duck is sure he can grow into a cat. Duck tries to walk like a cat, meow like a cat and act like a cat so you can imagine how silly this  duck is portrayed.  With considerable regret, duck has to come to the realization that he is just a duck!.

I enjoyed reading both of these books and the interactions between the duck and cat were both hilarious and enjoyable to read about.  These are great books for for our youngsters to enjoy with their parents or in a group setting.  These two books just bring a smile to your face.

Beverly (Davis)

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Goatilocks and the Three Bears

April 9, 2015

goatilocksGoatilocks and the Three Bears by Erica S. Perl

A fractured version of Goldilocks featuring a “kid,” a young goat, as the main character. The goat is as audacious as Goldilocks but with a goat-like twist: she eats everything! How can she make it up to the bears? There’s a surprising and satisfying answer to round out the story. The comical, cartoon-style illustrations add to the humor in this pleasing fractured fairy tale.goatilocks 2

So what is a fractured fairy tale? Take a regular fairy tale, then change the gender(s) of some of the characters, mix up the setting, add a little humor, and you have a new version of an old favorite.

These titles are often great for reading aloud with children who know the traditional tale well and can enjoy the humor of a different version. We have a list of them here.

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How Do Dinosaurs Stay Safe?

April 2, 2015

dinoHow Do Dinosaurs Stay Safe?

By Jane Yolen and Mark Teague

If you’re familiar with the How Do Dinosaurs series, you know that they cover a wide range of expected behaviors for kids. Yolen uses dinosaurs, a favorite for almost any child, to teach kids the best way to act and interact with their environment. In the newest book in the series, the dinosaurs show kids how to stay safe. The last few lines are my favorite. Dinosaur is “careful, not fearful. So here’s a big roar. Stay safe and play safe, little dinosaur.”

With open-ended questions all through the beginning of the book, How Do Dinosaurs Stay Safe? get the kids involved in answering with their ideas about staying safe. The humorous and colorful pictures of the dinos are engaging, while the ‘parents’ of the dinosaurs react in the backgrounds. If you look closely on each page, you’ll find the scientific names of all the dinosaurs pictured!

Recommended for ages 3-5.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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A Lullaby for Little One

March 31, 2015

lullA Lullaby for Little One

By Dawn Casey

Illustrated by Charles Fuge

This sweet story of a big daddy bunny and his baby bunny follows the pair all over their meadow as they play with friends. They hop and frolic and chase each other, playing hide and seek and peek-a-boo. At the end of the day, baby bunny gets a case of a sniffles when he gets tired. They say goodbye to their friends and big daddy bunny sings his little one a sweet lullaby.

Full of colorful, joyful illustrations, this story is a great bedtime treat for your little one. The rhyming text is soothing and predictable, allowing younger readers to become involved with guessing what could come next.

Recommended for ages 2-4.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Red: a crayon’s story

March 24, 2015

 

Enjoy another clever and educational book by Michael Hall.  What happens when you are considered to be a red crayon?  You even have a label on you that says  you are RED.  But whenever you are asked to create something that is red guess what color appears, BLUE!  Your crayon friends, parents and grandparents are all trying to understand you but even through encouragement they get a bit frustrated with you, the red crayon.  This labelled crayon that says RED never gives up and tries and tries to do what is expected of him.  Will he ever realize his true self, his true color?  Not let his label portray who his really is!

Michael Hall does a fabulous job with Red: a crayon’s story.  He develops such creativity within this book as he conveys an important lesson about life that many people young and old struggle with today.  The book gives parents and adults dealing with children the opportunity to discuss the importance of developing a sense of self and the effects of peer pressure.  The illustrations are fun, large and comical as each crayon is named according to their relationship with red crayon.  You will just have to pick up and read this book to appreciate the full impact of this delightful book.

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Monkey with a Tool Belt and the Noisy Problem

March 19, 2015

Monkey with a Tool Belt and the Noisy Problem

Written and illustrated by Chris Monroe

Chico Bon Bon, errant repairmonkey, is back with his tool belt in this companion book to Monkey with a Tool BeltWhen Chico wakes to a loud clatter, he searches his tree house to discover the source of the noise, only to find an elephant named Clark in his laundry shoot!  Can Chico solve this noisy problem?

As with the other two books featuring Chico (Monkey with a Tool Belt and Monkey with a Tool Belt and the Seaside Shenanigans), Monroe’s quirky illustrations and shameless sense of humor are a picture book win.  Jokes for both kids and adults make this adventure even more fun; be sure to read the entire list of tools on Chico’s tool belt to be rewarded with plenty of laughs!  With whimsicality and an eye on problem-solving skills, Chico may have kids asking for a tool belt of their own.  Recommended for preschool – 3rd grade.

 

Reviewed by Alyssa (Davis Library)

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Nancy Knows

February 27, 2015

nancyNancy Knows

By Cybele Young

Nancy the elephant can remember all sorts of things, but she knows she’s forgetting something important! As she tries to remember, we can see all of the things she’s thinking about filling up her line art. To try and determine what she’s forgotten, she remembers things that she knows. All sorts of paper sculptures fill the elephant as she thinks about things that are similar, like the same shape or color, things that face one way, then another, things in neat rows and things that are a jumbled mess. Nancy helps the reader lean about many opposites in her quest to remember what she’s forgotten. When she finally stops thinking and lets her mind rest, the answer finally comes to her!

Nancy Knows is a precious book with lots of little details to offer. You and your little one will find yourselves examining each picture to see what all you can find in Nancy’s thoughts. Challenge your child to think of other opposites that Nancy has forgotten, like hot and cold, or high and low.

Recommended for ages 4-7.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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My First Touch and Feel: PUPPIES

February 25, 2015

Puppies (My First Touch and Feel Books) Cover

My First Touch and Feel

PUPPIES

This board book combines simple text with adorable puppy pictures, each one with a sensory aspect. Your little one can touch fluffy fur, a soft pink tongue, silky fur, a smooth ball, and a shiny bright blue bow.

Though the words in the book are few, you can increase your child’s vocabulary by having him/her describe the pictures to you (or you can describe them to him/her if they aren’t yet verbal enough)

Having your child touch and feel the different textures can also improve their hand-eye coordination.

Books that incorporate textures for little hands are super engaging, and when they are combined with real puppy photos, that’s a jackpot in my book. Happy reading!

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What Ship is Not a Ship?

February 24, 2015

by Harriet Ziefert

A new book in our library called What Ship is Not a Ship is a fun guessing game for you and your child.  We all take for granted certain words and their definitions.  What if you asked the question, what is a bear?  I assumed it was a large heavy animal with thick fur and sharp claws.  But what bear is not a bear?  What hat is not a hat and what pie is not a pie?  These are just a few of the questions throughout this book that make you think in a different way.  Why not challenge your child and find new vocabulary words as well as a new way to think outside the box.  I must admit I did not know the answer to what bear is not a bear?  When I turned the page a beautifully illustrated picture of a woolly bear was looking at me. The illustrations are large and colorful which adds to the enjoyment of the book as well as the answer to the question.  Some of the questions are fairly easy but a few of them will make you pause and think!

I enjoyed this book from the moment I picked it up.  It is great book for children ages 3 and up and can be enjoyed one on one or in a group situation.

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Lost Sloth

February 10, 2015

Lost Sloth

By J. Otto Seibold

Sloth’s phone rings and rings. He races across the room to answer the call, but he’s a sloth, so it takes a while. The phone says he’s won an afternoon shopping spree! Can the sloth get to the store in time to claim his prize?

This book is just too good!  The fun story and colorful pictures will draw readers in, while quirky details in the illustrations make Lost Sloth perfect for repeat readings.  The ending is so clever, and just right for a sloth;  I wish I could be friends with this sloth!  Don’t dismiss this book as just a part of the current pop-culture sloth craze; Lost Sloth’s quirky originality put it in a class of its own!  Recommended for ages 3-6.


Reviewed by: Alyssa (Davis Library)

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