Posts Tagged ‘Children’s easy book’

Sleeping Cinderella and Other Princess Mix-ups

May 21, 2015

by Stephanie Clarkson

Most of us are familiar with these four princesses: Snow White, Rapunzel, Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella.  Could we have ever imagined these fairy tales could change and we could read a new version? Well enjoy this mixed-up version of these princesses.  Snow White is fed up with her sloppy housemates and just wants peace and quiet.  What could be quieter than a lonely tower where Rapunzel lives?  Rapunzel who has endured a life of isolation can’t wait to meet people and party.  Cinderella exhausted from the demands of her stepmother and stepsisters can’t even imagine going to a ball. Who is willing to dance the night away, Rapunzel. Cinderella just wants to sleep and where does she find the sofest bed which happens to be occupied by Sleeping Beauty.  Sleeping Beauty awakenend by an accidental kiss is searching for an active life and becomes acquainted with the 7 dwarfs who are in desperate need of help.  Will these mixed-up princesses find happiness with their new lifestyles?

Sleeping Cinderella and Other Princesses is a book written in rhyme and the words seem to flow together and create a realistic fantasy that can be enjoyed by everyone.

Reviewed by: Bev (Davis)

 

 

 

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New Shoes

May 7, 2015

index (1)New Shoes

by Susan Lynn Meyer

illustrated by Eric Velasquez

Ella Mae always got hand-me-down shoes from family. She looked into the shop windows of the local shoe shop with longing, wishing she could have her very own pair of new shoes. As she got close to the next year of school, the traditional hand-me-down phase of shoes got her a pair that just don’t fit. For the first time, she went to the shoe store and pick out a new pair of shoes. Instead of getting to try on the new shoes like the white girl in the shop ahead of her, Ella Mae had to trace around her feet on a piece of paper so the shop owner could guess at her size. Embarrassed, Ella Mae doesn’t even enjoy her new shoes. In response, Ella Mae and her friend Charlotte decide to make a shoe store all their own where ANYONE can try on their shoes before they buy them.

Set in the 1960s when segregation was still going strong in the south, New Shoes is a great way to learn about the history of our country. Ella Mae and Charlotte’s creative and determined approach to overcoming discrimination is inspiring for any reader.

Recommended for grades 1-3.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Hug Me

April 28, 2015

indexHug Me

By Simona Ciraolo

Hug Me is the story of Felipe, a young cactus who came from a family that kept everything neat and tidy and believed one should NEVER trespass into another’s personal space. The problem was, Felipe wanted a hug. He was taught to keep still, that he was for looking and not touching. He stretched himself up like the rest of his family, wishing that someone, anyone, would come by and wrap their arms around him.

One day, Felipe got in trouble, so he decided to leave. Felipe thought that maybe he was better off by himself, until he heard someone else who was feeling lonely too. Cactus or not, Felipe knew just what to do! With a big hug, Felipe makes his first real friend.

Recommended for ages 3-5.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig library

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Sidewalk Flowers

April 24, 2015

Sidewalk-Flowers-by-Jon-Arno-Lawson-on-BookDragonSidewalk Flowers

by JonArno Lawson and Sydney Smith

In this beautiful wordless picture book, a little girl walks through the city with her father collecting colorful flowers she finds growing in overlooked places. As she walks, she sees others who look like they could use a little bit of color too, so she leaves a little bit of cheer behind her as she goes, saving herself for last. A great way to talk about feelings of loneliness and sadness and about caring for others’ feelings. And the illustrations are detailed and absolutely gorgeous — worth pouring over multiple times!

Reviewed by: Lara (Haggard Library)

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Hey Duck and Just a Duck!

April 16, 2015

I couldn’t resist writing about these two books written and illustrated by Carin Bramsen,  Hey Duck and Just a Duck! The  illustrations are large and  beautiful and so realistic you just want to reach out and touch each fuzzy animal.  Speaking of animals we meet duck and cat.  Duck is an extremely friendly fellow and he is sure he has found a new friend, another duck.  He keeps asking the duck why is tail is so long?  Why doesn’t he like to swim in water?  Why doesn’t he quack?  You might be able to guess that his new friend is a cat.  Cat gets quite annoyed at this pesky duck but eventually responds to duck, “My sense of ME has gone AMUCK!” and begins to quack just like duck.  They form a bond through this adventure and their friendship is sealed.

 

Just a Duck? the sequel begins with duck deciding to become a cat.  Even though both cat and duck realize he looks nothing like a cat, duck is sure he can grow into a cat. Duck tries to walk like a cat, meow like a cat and act like a cat so you can imagine how silly this  duck is portrayed.  With considerable regret, duck has to come to the realization that he is just a duck!.

I enjoyed reading both of these books and the interactions between the duck and cat were both hilarious and enjoyable to read about.  These are great books for for our youngsters to enjoy with their parents or in a group setting.  These two books just bring a smile to your face.

Beverly (Davis)

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Goatilocks and the Three Bears

April 9, 2015

goatilocksGoatilocks and the Three Bears by Erica S. Perl

A fractured version of Goldilocks featuring a “kid,” a young goat, as the main character. The goat is as audacious as Goldilocks but with a goat-like twist: she eats everything! How can she make it up to the bears? There’s a surprising and satisfying answer to round out the story. The comical, cartoon-style illustrations add to the humor in this pleasing fractured fairy tale.goatilocks 2

So what is a fractured fairy tale? Take a regular fairy tale, then change the gender(s) of some of the characters, mix up the setting, add a little humor, and you have a new version of an old favorite.

These titles are often great for reading aloud with children who know the traditional tale well and can enjoy the humor of a different version. We have a list of them here.

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How Do Dinosaurs Stay Safe?

April 2, 2015

dinoHow Do Dinosaurs Stay Safe?

By Jane Yolen and Mark Teague

If you’re familiar with the How Do Dinosaurs series, you know that they cover a wide range of expected behaviors for kids. Yolen uses dinosaurs, a favorite for almost any child, to teach kids the best way to act and interact with their environment. In the newest book in the series, the dinosaurs show kids how to stay safe. The last few lines are my favorite. Dinosaur is “careful, not fearful. So here’s a big roar. Stay safe and play safe, little dinosaur.”

With open-ended questions all through the beginning of the book, How Do Dinosaurs Stay Safe? get the kids involved in answering with their ideas about staying safe. The humorous and colorful pictures of the dinos are engaging, while the ‘parents’ of the dinosaurs react in the backgrounds. If you look closely on each page, you’ll find the scientific names of all the dinosaurs pictured!

Recommended for ages 3-5.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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A Lullaby for Little One

March 31, 2015

lullA Lullaby for Little One

By Dawn Casey

Illustrated by Charles Fuge

This sweet story of a big daddy bunny and his baby bunny follows the pair all over their meadow as they play with friends. They hop and frolic and chase each other, playing hide and seek and peek-a-boo. At the end of the day, baby bunny gets a case of a sniffles when he gets tired. They say goodbye to their friends and big daddy bunny sings his little one a sweet lullaby.

Full of colorful, joyful illustrations, this story is a great bedtime treat for your little one. The rhyming text is soothing and predictable, allowing younger readers to become involved with guessing what could come next.

Recommended for ages 2-4.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Red: a crayon’s story

March 24, 2015

 

Enjoy another clever and educational book by Michael Hall.  What happens when you are considered to be a red crayon?  You even have a label on you that says  you are RED.  But whenever you are asked to create something that is red guess what color appears, BLUE!  Your crayon friends, parents and grandparents are all trying to understand you but even through encouragement they get a bit frustrated with you, the red crayon.  This labelled crayon that says RED never gives up and tries and tries to do what is expected of him.  Will he ever realize his true self, his true color?  Not let his label portray who his really is!

Michael Hall does a fabulous job with Red: a crayon’s story.  He develops such creativity within this book as he conveys an important lesson about life that many people young and old struggle with today.  The book gives parents and adults dealing with children the opportunity to discuss the importance of developing a sense of self and the effects of peer pressure.  The illustrations are fun, large and comical as each crayon is named according to their relationship with red crayon.  You will just have to pick up and read this book to appreciate the full impact of this delightful book.

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Monkey with a Tool Belt and the Noisy Problem

March 19, 2015

Monkey with a Tool Belt and the Noisy Problem

Written and illustrated by Chris Monroe

Chico Bon Bon, errant repairmonkey, is back with his tool belt in this companion book to Monkey with a Tool BeltWhen Chico wakes to a loud clatter, he searches his tree house to discover the source of the noise, only to find an elephant named Clark in his laundry shoot!  Can Chico solve this noisy problem?

As with the other two books featuring Chico (Monkey with a Tool Belt and Monkey with a Tool Belt and the Seaside Shenanigans), Monroe’s quirky illustrations and shameless sense of humor are a picture book win.  Jokes for both kids and adults make this adventure even more fun; be sure to read the entire list of tools on Chico’s tool belt to be rewarded with plenty of laughs!  With whimsicality and an eye on problem-solving skills, Chico may have kids asking for a tool belt of their own.  Recommended for preschool – 3rd grade.

 

Reviewed by Alyssa (Davis Library)

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