Posts Tagged ‘Children’s easy book’

Nancy Knows

February 27, 2015

nancyNancy Knows

By Cybele Young

Nancy the elephant can remember all sorts of things, but she knows she’s forgetting something important! As she tries to remember, we can see all of the things she’s thinking about filling up her line art. To try and determine what she’s forgotten, she remembers things that she knows. All sorts of paper sculptures fill the elephant as she thinks about things that are similar, like the same shape or color, things that face one way, then another, things in neat rows and things that are a jumbled mess. Nancy helps the reader lean about many opposites in her quest to remember what she’s forgotten. When she finally stops thinking and lets her mind rest, the answer finally comes to her!

Nancy Knows is a precious book with lots of little details to offer. You and your little one will find yourselves examining each picture to see what all you can find in Nancy’s thoughts. Challenge your child to think of other opposites that Nancy has forgotten, like hot and cold, or high and low.

Recommended for ages 4-7.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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My First Touch and Feel: PUPPIES

February 25, 2015

Puppies (My First Touch and Feel Books) Cover

My First Touch and Feel

PUPPIES

This board book combines simple text with adorable puppy pictures, each one with a sensory aspect. Your little one can touch fluffy fur, a soft pink tongue, silky fur, a smooth ball, and a shiny bright blue bow.

Though the words in the book are few, you can increase your child’s vocabulary by having him/her describe the pictures to you (or you can describe them to him/her if they aren’t yet verbal enough)

Having your child touch and feel the different textures can also improve their hand-eye coordination.

Books that incorporate textures for little hands are super engaging, and when they are combined with real puppy photos, that’s a jackpot in my book. Happy reading!

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What Ship is Not a Ship?

February 24, 2015

by Harriet Ziefert

A new book in our library called What Ship is Not a Ship is a fun guessing game for you and your child.  We all take for granted certain words and their definitions.  What if you asked the question, what is a bear?  I assumed it was a large heavy animal with thick fur and sharp claws.  But what bear is not a bear?  What hat is not a hat and what pie is not a pie?  These are just a few of the questions throughout this book that make you think in a different way.  Why not challenge your child and find new vocabulary words as well as a new way to think outside the box.  I must admit I did not know the answer to what bear is not a bear?  When I turned the page a beautifully illustrated picture of a woolly bear was looking at me. The illustrations are large and colorful which adds to the enjoyment of the book as well as the answer to the question.  Some of the questions are fairly easy but a few of them will make you pause and think!

I enjoyed this book from the moment I picked it up.  It is great book for children ages 3 and up and can be enjoyed one on one or in a group situation.

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Lost Sloth

February 10, 2015

Lost Sloth

By J. Otto Seibold

Sloth’s phone rings and rings. He races across the room to answer the call, but he’s a sloth, so it takes a while. The phone says he’s won an afternoon shopping spree! Can the sloth get to the store in time to claim his prize?

This book is just too good!  The fun story and colorful pictures will draw readers in, while quirky details in the illustrations make Lost Sloth perfect for repeat readings.  The ending is so clever, and just right for a sloth;  I wish I could be friends with this sloth!  Don’t dismiss this book as just a part of the current pop-culture sloth craze; Lost Sloth’s quirky originality put it in a class of its own!  Recommended for ages 3-6.


Reviewed by: Alyssa (Davis Library)

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Doug Unplugs on the Farm

February 6, 2015

dougDoug Unplugs on the Farm

By: Dan Yaccarino

Doug, an adorable golden robot who wants to learn about his world, returns in his second book Doug Unplugs on the Farm. As a city robot, Doug doesn’t know much about what happens on a farm. He has downloaded information about cows and plows and pigs, but he prefers to learn by doing. While he knows milk comes from cows, he learns that a cow’s tongue feels rough. As he helps out a local farm girl, he finds all sorts of new information, like the fact that hay is prickly and fresh apples straight from the tree are delicious (and that the horse thinks the apples AND the hay are delicious!)

This sweet, simple book shows how learning things first-hand can mean so much more to a child than ‘downloading’ things from the internet. There’s so many senses for us to use while we take in new experiences. Use this book to talk with your little one about how taste, smell, sound, and touch can change the way we look at the world!

If you like Doug Unplugs on the Farm, make sure to check out his first book:

doug1

Doug Unplugged

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recommended for ages 4-7.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Edgar’s Second Word

January 28, 2015

Edgar's Second WordEdgar’s Second Word

By: Audrey Vernick

Illustrated by: Priscilla Burris

Hazel was soooo excited for her new baby brother. She planned on doing all sorts of fun things with him, especially reading. But when Edgar finally arrived, he wasn’t much different than her stuffed bunny Rodrigo! He didn’t talk, or move around much, so Hazel had to go back to waiting. One day (years later), Edgar finally said his first word! He said it with meaning! With conviction! “NO!” Surely that meant they could start playing all kinds of games? The problem was that Edgar’s first word was his only word. He said no to everything Hazel wanted to do. Still, Hazel was patient. When his second word finally comes, Hazel’s patience pays off.

Edgar’s Second Word is a great read for those who might be expecting a new sibling. It’s a sweet book full of love and well worth a read. The illustrations are simple, but colorful. You can’t help but love Hazel and little Edgar both.

Recommended for ages 4-7.

Nicole P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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In My Heart: A Book of Feelings

January 23, 2015

 

You can’t help but notice the cover of this whimsical book, In My Heart: A Book of Feelings.  Die-cuts of hearts which decrease in size as you turn each page gives this book a unique appearance.  Each page is filled with a heart and expresses a young girl’s feelings.  The colorful illustrations just add to the charm of this book as the portrayal of each emotion is clearly visible.  Sometimes her heart feels like a balloon, as heavy as an elephant, tall as a plant or hidden away where no one can see.  Feelings can be communicated in so many different ways and so pick up this book with your young child and enjoy the many feelings we all try to understand.

This book can be enjoyed in a group situation as well as one on one with your special little one.

Beverly  (Davis)

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Boom Boom

January 16, 2015

Boom Boom CoverBoom Boom

By Sarvinder Naberhaus

Illustrated by Margaret Chodos-Irvine

 BOOM BOOM! FLASH! FLASH!  A classroom of multicultural preschool children listen and watch in awe during a spring thunderstorm. One little boy is frightened by the loud noise and holds his hands over his ears but is reassured by a little girl who takes his hand and leads him outside with the rest of the class to explore and splash in puddles after the storm.  We follow the class and the 2 new friends throughout the seasons as they find insects among the summer blossoms, crunch apples and jump in leaves in the fall, and finally catch snowflakes in the winter. Naberhaus employs one or two words in a rhyming pattern as the seasons progress and the children use their senses to interact with their environment.

Chodos-Irvine uses a variety of nontraditional materials and various printmaking techniques to lead viewers through the changing landscapes and the children’s accompanying activities. This is a unique and engaging exploration of the seasons for preschoolers as well as for early readers.

Reviewed by Connie (Parr Library)

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Strongheart

January 13, 2015

indexStrongheart
By Emily Arnold McCully

Strongheart is the true story of the world’s first movie star dog. He was a new breed of dog born in Germany during the World Wars, the German Shepard, used to help the police in apprehending criminals. When the war ended, Etzel von Oeringen was sent to America to be sold. Well trained and very determined, Etzel caught the eye of a movie director named Larry Trimble. The problem was, Etzel didn’t know how to be a dog! Before Larry could film Etzel for the movies, he had to teach his dog how to play.

When Etzel finally got in front of the cameras, he was incredible! He could look sad and happy and worried, something no other movie dog had done before. In all his films, Etzel was the hero, so Larry decided to start calling him Strongheart. This is a great book for any child who has an interest in dogs. They’ll learn some fun facts about the early years of the movie, and how a German Shepard became the very first movie star dog.

Recommended for ages 5-9.

Nicki P.

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Just One More

December 23, 2014

justonemoreJust One More

By Jennifer Hansen Rolli

We’ve all done it. We’ve all asked for one more push on the swing, or one more cookie, or just one more minute of sleep. Ruby is ALWAYS asking for “just one more” of so many things. Sometimes it gets to be a little to much! When she asks for one more scoop of ice cream to go on her tall, TALL stack, suddenly she looses everything! Poor Ruby.

Just One More is a cute, simple book that reminds everyone that “just one more” can end up being just one too many (except when it comes to goodnight kisses!). The large text stands out on the brightly colored background, making it a great book to read together to sound out the words, or to share with your littlest one. Ruby’s adorable expressions will make your kids want to read it “just one more” time.

Recommended for ages 2-4.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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