Posts Tagged ‘Children’s easy book’

Touch the Brightest Star

June 24, 2015

by Christie Matheson

While looking at our new books I came across, “Touch the Brightest Star” by Christie Matheson.  She also wrote, “Tap the Magic Tree” and  illustrated both books.  The illustrations are beautifully blended watercolors that begin in the morning and drift into the night.  Each page pulls you into the book as you wave, press, blow, and pat, tap, count to three, swipe, blink, trace, rub, close your eyes, nod and touch the brightest star.  What a great book to interact with your children and let their imaginations soar on each and every page.

I enjoyed this book and even though I read it by myself I followed all the directions which made the book so much fun.  This book can be enjoyed by young children as well as older children.  The interaction that is required just pulls you into the magic of the book.

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The Boy and the Book

June 18, 2015

boybookThe Boy and the Book

By David Michael Slater

Illustrated by Bob Kolar

With just three words, this book tells the story of the joy of learning to read. It’s a struggle at first, sometimes frustrating, but when the words start to make sense, it opens up a whole new world. The young boy in the story comes into the library with his mother, sending the books scattering in terror. He finds a blue book with monsters, but doesn’t take very good care of it. When he’s gone, the book gets taped back together. The boy returns and the other books try to save their friend. This time, the book sees that in order for the boy to learn to read, he must be given the chance.

This book can help build your child’s narrative skills. By leaving out the words, it allows the reader to fill in the story with their own words and imagination. Try letting your child verbally narrate the book, or make the story up together. Narrative skills are an important part of early literacy.

Recommended for ages 2-5.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Turtle Island

June 2, 2015

turtleTurtle Island

By Kevin Sherry

The ocean is a very big place, as Kevin Sherry taught us in his other picture books I’m the Biggest Thing in the Ocean and I’m the Best Artist in the Ocean. The giant turtle in Turtle Island is lonely. Even though he is VERY big, he doesn’t have any friends. A big storm changes that one day and he meets four animals who all have special talents. Together, they make turtle their new home (and the first Turtle Island). Turtle is so happy to have friends that he forgets Bear, Cat, Owl, and Frog all have homes and families. He must say a teary goodbye to his new friends, but not for long! Soon his friends return with a special surprise!

With fun, bright colors and friendly characters, Turtle Island is a fun read to share together. It has simple text, but so much to look at in the tiny towns on turtle’s back. Try using the pictures to tell your own story with your child to encourage their imaginations.

Recommended for ages 3-5.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Bear Counts

May 28, 2015

bear-counts-9781442480926_hr

Bear Counts, by Karma Wilson, illustrated by Jane Chapman

This concept book by Karma Wilson introduces the numbers from one to five. Wilson’s familiar “Bear” spends the day with mouse. Throughout the day, the two run into different friends. Each friend has items that allow Bear to count. The phrase, “Numbers, numbers, everywhere. Can you count with Bear?” is repeated throughout the book. When each number is mentioned, several items are grouped on the page that show the number. Each number, 1 through 5, is presented in this way. The text is rhyming and the illustrations have bright colors and details. There is much white space between texts which makes it easy to see and count the items on the page. Since the book only counts to 5, it is perfect for younger children. The book is recommended for children 3 to 7.

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I am Jackie Robinson

May 27, 2015

jackieI am Jackie Robinson

By Brad Meltzer

Illustrated by Christopher Eliopoulos

Brad Meltzer’s series Ordinary People Change the World show heroes all throughout history in a new light. Each book is told in first person, with the historical figure telling the story about their lives and accomplishments. The illustrations are comical and fun, making it an interesting read for younger kids as well as older. What makes the books unique is that the heroes are drawn to look like children, letting the reader relate to these normally bigger-than-life people.

In his newest book in the series, Brad Meltzer shows the life of Jackie Robinson, world renowned athlete and warrior for equality. Jackie was the first African American to play on a major-league baseball team. Though he faced discrimination all of his life, Jackie learned tolerance from his mother and applied it wherever he could. People were mean to him on the field and off of it, but Jackie kept his head high and played baseball with everything he had. His example opened the doors for all races to play together.

Recommended for grades K-2.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

If you enjoy I am Jackie Robinson, make sure to check out the other books in the series!

ameliarosaalbert

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Sleeping Cinderella and Other Princess Mix-ups

May 21, 2015

by Stephanie Clarkson

Most of us are familiar with these four princesses: Snow White, Rapunzel, Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella.  Could we have ever imagined these fairy tales could change and we could read a new version? Well enjoy this mixed-up version of these princesses.  Snow White is fed up with her sloppy housemates and just wants peace and quiet.  What could be quieter than a lonely tower where Rapunzel lives?  Rapunzel who has endured a life of isolation can’t wait to meet people and party.  Cinderella exhausted from the demands of her stepmother and stepsisters can’t even imagine going to a ball. Who is willing to dance the night away, Rapunzel. Cinderella just wants to sleep and where does she find the sofest bed which happens to be occupied by Sleeping Beauty.  Sleeping Beauty awakenend by an accidental kiss is searching for an active life and becomes acquainted with the 7 dwarfs who are in desperate need of help.  Will these mixed-up princesses find happiness with their new lifestyles?

Sleeping Cinderella and Other Princesses is a book written in rhyme and the words seem to flow together and create a realistic fantasy that can be enjoyed by everyone.

Reviewed by: Bev (Davis)

 

 

 

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New Shoes

May 7, 2015

index (1)New Shoes

by Susan Lynn Meyer

illustrated by Eric Velasquez

Ella Mae always got hand-me-down shoes from family. She looked into the shop windows of the local shoe shop with longing, wishing she could have her very own pair of new shoes. As she got close to the next year of school, the traditional hand-me-down phase of shoes got her a pair that just don’t fit. For the first time, she went to the shoe store and pick out a new pair of shoes. Instead of getting to try on the new shoes like the white girl in the shop ahead of her, Ella Mae had to trace around her feet on a piece of paper so the shop owner could guess at her size. Embarrassed, Ella Mae doesn’t even enjoy her new shoes. In response, Ella Mae and her friend Charlotte decide to make a shoe store all their own where ANYONE can try on their shoes before they buy them.

Set in the 1960s when segregation was still going strong in the south, New Shoes is a great way to learn about the history of our country. Ella Mae and Charlotte’s creative and determined approach to overcoming discrimination is inspiring for any reader.

Recommended for grades 1-3.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Hug Me

April 28, 2015

indexHug Me

By Simona Ciraolo

Hug Me is the story of Felipe, a young cactus who came from a family that kept everything neat and tidy and believed one should NEVER trespass into another’s personal space. The problem was, Felipe wanted a hug. He was taught to keep still, that he was for looking and not touching. He stretched himself up like the rest of his family, wishing that someone, anyone, would come by and wrap their arms around him.

One day, Felipe got in trouble, so he decided to leave. Felipe thought that maybe he was better off by himself, until he heard someone else who was feeling lonely too. Cactus or not, Felipe knew just what to do! With a big hug, Felipe makes his first real friend.

Recommended for ages 3-5.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig library

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Sidewalk Flowers

April 24, 2015

Sidewalk-Flowers-by-Jon-Arno-Lawson-on-BookDragonSidewalk Flowers

by JonArno Lawson and Sydney Smith

In this beautiful wordless picture book, a little girl walks through the city with her father collecting colorful flowers she finds growing in overlooked places. As she walks, she sees others who look like they could use a little bit of color too, so she leaves a little bit of cheer behind her as she goes, saving herself for last. A great way to talk about feelings of loneliness and sadness and about caring for others’ feelings. And the illustrations are detailed and absolutely gorgeous — worth pouring over multiple times!

Reviewed by: Lara (Haggard Library)

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Hey Duck and Just a Duck!

April 16, 2015

I couldn’t resist writing about these two books written and illustrated by Carin Bramsen,  Hey Duck and Just a Duck! The  illustrations are large and  beautiful and so realistic you just want to reach out and touch each fuzzy animal.  Speaking of animals we meet duck and cat.  Duck is an extremely friendly fellow and he is sure he has found a new friend, another duck.  He keeps asking the duck why is tail is so long?  Why doesn’t he like to swim in water?  Why doesn’t he quack?  You might be able to guess that his new friend is a cat.  Cat gets quite annoyed at this pesky duck but eventually responds to duck, “My sense of ME has gone AMUCK!” and begins to quack just like duck.  They form a bond through this adventure and their friendship is sealed.

 

Just a Duck? the sequel begins with duck deciding to become a cat.  Even though both cat and duck realize he looks nothing like a cat, duck is sure he can grow into a cat. Duck tries to walk like a cat, meow like a cat and act like a cat so you can imagine how silly this  duck is portrayed.  With considerable regret, duck has to come to the realization that he is just a duck!.

I enjoyed reading both of these books and the interactions between the duck and cat were both hilarious and enjoyable to read about.  These are great books for for our youngsters to enjoy with their parents or in a group setting.  These two books just bring a smile to your face.

Beverly (Davis)

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