Posts Tagged ‘Children’s easy book’

Edgar’s Second Word

January 28, 2015

Edgar's Second WordEdgar’s Second Word

By: Audrey Vernick

Illustrated by: Priscilla Burris

Hazel was soooo excited for her new baby brother. She planned on doing all sorts of fun things with him, especially reading. But when Edgar finally arrived, he wasn’t much different than her stuffed bunny Rodrigo! He didn’t talk, or move around much, so Hazel had to go back to waiting. One day (years later), Edgar finally said his first word! He said it with meaning! With conviction! “NO!” Surely that meant they could start playing all kinds of games? The problem was that Edgar’s first word was his only word. He said no to everything Hazel wanted to do. Still, Hazel was patient. When his second word finally comes, Hazel’s patience pays off.

Edgar’s Second Word is a great read for those who might be expecting a new sibling. It’s a sweet book full of love and well worth a read. The illustrations are simple, but colorful. You can’t help but love Hazel and little Edgar both.

Recommended for ages 4-7.

Nicole P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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In My Heart: A Book of Feelings

January 23, 2015

 

You can’t help but notice the cover of this whimsical book, In My Heart: A Book of Feelings.  Die-cuts of hearts which decrease in size as you turn each page gives this book a unique appearance.  Each page is filled with a heart and expresses a young girl’s feelings.  The colorful illustrations just add to the charm of this book as the portrayal of each emotion is clearly visible.  Sometimes her heart feels like a balloon, as heavy as an elephant, tall as a plant or hidden away where no one can see.  Feelings can be communicated in so many different ways and so pick up this book with your young child and enjoy the many feelings we all try to understand.

This book can be enjoyed in a group situation as well as one on one with your special little one.

Beverly  (Davis)

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Boom Boom

January 16, 2015

Boom Boom CoverBoom Boom

By Sarvinder Naberhaus

Illustrated by Margaret Chodos-Irvine

 BOOM BOOM! FLASH! FLASH!  A classroom of multicultural preschool children listen and watch in awe during a spring thunderstorm. One little boy is frightened by the loud noise and holds his hands over his ears but is reassured by a little girl who takes his hand and leads him outside with the rest of the class to explore and splash in puddles after the storm.  We follow the class and the 2 new friends throughout the seasons as they find insects among the summer blossoms, crunch apples and jump in leaves in the fall, and finally catch snowflakes in the winter. Naberhaus employs one or two words in a rhyming pattern as the seasons progress and the children use their senses to interact with their environment.

Chodos-Irvine uses a variety of nontraditional materials and various printmaking techniques to lead viewers through the changing landscapes and the children’s accompanying activities. This is a unique and engaging exploration of the seasons for preschoolers as well as for early readers.

Reviewed by Connie (Parr Library)

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Strongheart

January 13, 2015

indexStrongheart
By Emily Arnold McCully

Strongheart is the true story of the world’s first movie star dog. He was a new breed of dog born in Germany during the World Wars, the German Shepard, used to help the police in apprehending criminals. When the war ended, Etzel von Oeringen was sent to America to be sold. Well trained and very determined, Etzel caught the eye of a movie director named Larry Trimble. The problem was, Etzel didn’t know how to be a dog! Before Larry could film Etzel for the movies, he had to teach his dog how to play.

When Etzel finally got in front of the cameras, he was incredible! He could look sad and happy and worried, something no other movie dog had done before. In all his films, Etzel was the hero, so Larry decided to start calling him Strongheart. This is a great book for any child who has an interest in dogs. They’ll learn some fun facts about the early years of the movie, and how a German Shepard became the very first movie star dog.

Recommended for ages 5-9.

Nicki P.

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Just One More

December 23, 2014

justonemoreJust One More

By Jennifer Hansen Rolli

We’ve all done it. We’ve all asked for one more push on the swing, or one more cookie, or just one more minute of sleep. Ruby is ALWAYS asking for “just one more” of so many things. Sometimes it gets to be a little to much! When she asks for one more scoop of ice cream to go on her tall, TALL stack, suddenly she looses everything! Poor Ruby.

Just One More is a cute, simple book that reminds everyone that “just one more” can end up being just one too many (except when it comes to goodnight kisses!). The large text stands out on the brightly colored background, making it a great book to read together to sound out the words, or to share with your littlest one. Ruby’s adorable expressions will make your kids want to read it “just one more” time.

Recommended for ages 2-4.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Upside Down Babies

December 17, 2014

by Jeanne Willis

“Once when the world tipped upside down, the earth went blue and the sky went brown.  All the baby animals tumbled out of bed and ended up with very funny moms instead.”  These are the first two sentence in this clever and beautifully illustrated book, “Upside Down Babies.”  We would all be a bit shocked to see a pig falling into a parrot’s nest.  But just imagine how that parrot mom would feel.   How about a polar bear landing in the desert next to her new mom, a camel.   A cheetah faster than lightning ends up with a sloth, can anything be slower.  This cheery book brings humor to each page as each mom is faced with unthinkable challenges gazing on their new babies.  Of course, the world does turn around but the ending may surprise you as a few babies and moms actually are happier with their new arrivals.

This book is great for our toddlers as well as preschool children.  Any adult would enjoy sharing this book with a group of children as well as a fun read one on one.

Davis – (Bev)

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Sam & Dave Dig a Hole

December 16, 2014

Sam & Dave Dig a Hole by Mac Barnett with illustrations by Jon Klassen

Sam and Dave are on a mission to dig a hole in search of something spectacular.  As they try to figure out the best strategy, the reader (and the knowing dog) see the big gems that the pair are missing.  When they fall asleep and free-fall through the deeper hole, they end up falling from above, back to where they were before…or is it?  With sepia-toned illustrations, spare text and the reader in the know, children will enjoy the surprise ending.

This story reminded of that child-like belief that you can dig a hole to China, and the illustrations brought to mind that classic, A Hole is to Dig by Ruth Krauss.  Enjoy!

 

 

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Planet Kindergarten

December 10, 2014

planetPlanet Kindergarten

By Sue Ganz-Schmitt

Illustrated by Shane Prigmore

3, 2, 1, BLAST OFF! The boy in this book is training to explore Planet Kindergarten on his very first mission. He checks his plans for the next day, gets his supplies with his mom, gets two thumbs up from the doctor, and prepares for lift off! It’s difficult to explore a strange new world on his own, but he doesn’t want his parents to worry, so he stands tall. His crew mates are all strange creatures. Though he’s dealing with many unusual crew members, the boy manages to make a new friend.

Planet Kindergarten is an outrageous space-themed adventure with lots of fun characters. If your child is a fan of space, or zany books, they’ll love reading this adventure. The illustrations are extremely colorful and fun, giving hints about the normal day behind the space mission. There’s even a few Star Trek references for the grown ups! You might consider reading it to prepare your little one for his or her own trip to kindergarten!

Recommended for ages 3-5.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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This Book Just Ate My Dog!

November 28, 2014

This Bo9781627790710ok Just Ate My Dog!

by Richard Byrne

When her dog disappears into the gutter of the book, Bella calls for help. But when the helpers disappear too, Bella realizes it will take more than a tug on the leash to put things right.

With a little direction from Bella, readers will turn, shake and jiggle the book until everyone’s been rescued! This Book Just Ate My Dog is a clever, funny story that can’t help but delight!

And if you like this one, you can also try:

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Reviewed by: Lara (Haggard Library)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Zeraffa Giraffa

November 18, 2014

zeraffa giraffaZeraffa Giraffa

By Dianne Hofmeyr

Illustrated by Jane Ray

Zeraffa the giraffe was caught in Africa. No taller than the tallest hunter, she was just a baby. When she was presented to the Pasha, he was delighted. He decided that she would be the perfect gift for his friend, the king of France. Zeraffa was given to a boy named Atir, who would care for her on the long journey. They first took a small boat up the Nile River, then a bigger boat across the Mediterranean Sea, and then Atir and Zeraffa walked the great distance to the beautiful city of Paris!

Through the whole journey, Zeraffa keeps growing, and growing, and growing! By the time they reach the King, she’s taller than any animal the French have ever seen. They loved her right away! Soon, French ladies were styling their wigs to be as tall as they could and they decorated their homes with the pattern on Zeraffa’s fur. The French people made cookies in the shape of giraffes and trimmed their bushes to look like her. But the one who loved her most of all was the King’s granddaughter.

Zeraffa Giraffa is a beautiful book about a giraffe’s great journey. The soft illustrations will capture the reader’s imagination and transport them to a time long ago when no one had ever seen a giraffe in Paris.

Recommended for ages: 6-10

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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