Posts Tagged ‘Children’s easy book’

Penguin Problems

November 30, 2016

penguin-problemsPenguin Problems
By Jory John
Illustrated by Lane Smith

Penguins. Cute and Cuddly. They waddle, they can’t fly, the all look alike. What could be better? To this little penguin, everything. I mean he waddles and looks silly when he does. He wants to fly, but he can’t. They all look alike and he looks like everyone else, repetitive but true. This penguin has problems, lots of them. In a very humorous tale, see the side of penguin life that is hard, really hard. Until a very nice walrus give him a little perspective. The mountains, the ocean, family and friends. All things the penguin can appreciate. But it is still cold and dark way too early.

By Ashley (Davis Library)

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Miles is a Mighty Brothersaurus

November 22, 2016

brotherMiles is a Mighty Brothersaurus

By Samantha Kurtzman-Counter and Abbie Schiller

If you have more than one child, you know that sometimes kids can compare themselves to their siblings. Maybe one is great at math, or sports, or science, but their younger (or older) sibling feels like they can’t be as impressive or successful. This Miles book addresses that problem and more. Miles is a middle child who loves dinosaurs. His older brother is great at baseball, winning trophy after trophy, while his younger brother is a gymnast. It leaves Miles feeling like he’s not any good at anything. With a little help from his loving grandpa, Miles learns that he has good qualities that are just as important as being good at sports.

If you struggle with a child that is going through something like this, then Miles can help them see it’s important to be yourself. This book is part of a bigger collection that focuses on “Helping Parents Raise Good People”. I expect to see more from this series in the future, but now you can find When Miles Got Mad and Miles is the Boss of His Body on the shelves at our library. Both discuss topics that can sometimes be difficult to approach, giving you a starting point for helping your child face problems.

Recommended for ages 4-7.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

Here are the other books in this award-winning series (click image to go to catalog):

mad

boss

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President Squid

November 11, 2016

Image result for president squid President Squid

By Aaron Reynolds

Illustrated by Sara Varon

We have a new president. Half of the grown-ups around are now ready to wait 4 years for a new one. The other half are excited to see what wonderful things their choice will make as the leader of our country. The kids of the US are wondering what is takes to be a president. In the book President Squid, he looks at what qualities he has that will make him the “greatest president ever” and the first giant squid president. President Squid tells you the important qualities a president should have. They should wear a tie, have the biggest house ever, be famous, do all the talking and be the BIG BOSS. As you go through the story you (and President Squid, too!) find out if he knows the right traits and if he is really ready to be president. With fun illustrations and lots of personality, this is a must read fun book.

Review by Ashley, Davis Library

 

 

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A Unicorn Named Sparkle

November 2, 2016

unicornA Unicorn Named Sparkle

By Amy Young

I’m sure we’ve all bought something and had certain expectations for it, only to be disappointed. Well, when Lucy buys a unicorn from an ad in a magazine, she’s already dreaming of a big, majestic creature that she can ride to school. All of her friends will be so jealous! When Sparkle finally arrives, he is not big, or majestic, and Lucy is pretty sure he has fleas. Despite her disappointment, Lucy tries to make the best of it. She plays dress up with her new unicorn, but he eats everything, including the tutu. He behaves poorly at show-and-tell (and he has gas, ewwwww). Lucy calls the unicorn delivery company to come pick him up, but finds that maybe, just maybe, this little unicorn isn’t so bad after all.

A great story about learning to see what’s under the surface, Sparkle the Unicorn will steal your heart just like he stole Lucy’s. If you give someone a chance to show their true colors, you might find that even a smelly goat can be the best unicorn friend.

Recommended for ages 3-7.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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They All Saw a Cat

October 24, 2016

cat1They All Saw a Cat by Brendan Wenzel

It’s all about perception in this picture book about a cat who “walked through the world, with its whiskers, ears and paws…” The cat is seen by a child, a fish, a dog and more.  Each creature views the cat through different eyes, whether it be blurry, big cat eyes for the fish, or a beast with long claws and sharp teeth by the mouse.  A bird views the cat from above, and a flea sees the cat as it nestles in its fur.  While the text is simple and repetitive, the varying perspectives of the illustrations tell the multi-faceted story of how one cat can be seen by so many in so many different ways!  With many wide, full-page spreads, this one would be fun to read with a child and talk about how and why each creature sees the cat so differently.

cat-2

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Art Time With Lois Ehlert

October 21, 2016

Leaf-Man-COVERLooking for something to do on a lazy weekday? It’s time for some fall crafts! You could start off your craft day reading books like Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf and Leaf Man, which are artfully illustrated with photographs of real leaves and objects. If you’ve never read a book by Lois Ehlert, you’re in for a treat! Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf follows the growth of a maple tree from the time the seed lands on the ground all the way through to a full grown tree with big, beautiful leaves that turn colors in the fall. Where Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf teaches about trees, Leaf Man is bursting with creative things you can do with the leaves! The leaves start their journey as a leaf man, but turn into all sorts of different animals and objects with a little imagination!

So, what’s next? Now it’s time to go on a walk and gather as many leaves, acorns, and bits of nature that you can! Bring back your goodies and lay them out on some paper. This could be an exercise in process art (which focuses more on the play and process than the finished product) or you can aim to replicate one of the fun pictures you found in your books! If you’re strapped for ideas, come into the library to pick up one of our many craft books.

The most important thing to remember is to have fun! Let your children’s imaginations run wild with their projects and you might end up creating something that represents fall in the best way.

Here are a few craft ideas to get you started:

Leaf Rubbings

Leaf Impressions

Hedgehog Hibernation Basket

Owl Mask

Happy crafting!

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Lizbeth Lou Got a Rock in Her Shoe

October 11, 2016

lizbethLizbeth Lou Got a Rock in Her Shoe

By Troy Howell

Illustrated by Kathryn Carr

Something as small as a rock couldn’t be that big a deal, could it? When Lizbeth Lou tosses the pebble away, she doesn’t realize that a tiny rock could be a BIG problem for someone else. That little rock nearly sinks a cricket’s boat but is hardly noticeable to a passing bike. The pebble bounces here and there, encountering creatures big and small until it finds its way back to a very familiar shoe.

The illustrations in this book are gorgeous. They’re created with layered cut paper illuminated from behind that gives it a whimsical feel. With the rhyming text and beautiful pictures, this book is sure to please any reader.

Recommended for ages 5-7.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Bedtime For Batman

September 28, 2016

Bedtime for Batman

Written by Michael Dahl

Illustrated by Ethen Beavers

 

This is a cleverly written story of a little boy getting ready for bed – decked out in costume and imagining that he is Batman – juxtaposed with the superhero doing what he does best on the opposing pages. The simple text works for both scenarios at once, and the detailed illustrations are fantastic – with the boy’s toys matching Batman’s allies and enemies. This fun and engaging book will be enjoyed by children and superhero fans alike.  Happy reading!

 

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Next to You

September 27, 2016

nextNext to You: A Book of Adorableness

By Lori Haskins Houran

Illustrated by Sydney Hanson

What could be cuter than a basket of baby chicks? Or a bunny, the kind with the little round fluffy tail? How about a baby elephant taking a bath? Why, it’s you! Of course! When it comes to new babies, friends, or other special people in your life, it’s very important to let them know just how adorable they are. This small book is FULL of adorableness, from little ducklings to baby tigers. With a little bit of comedy thrown in, Next to You can give some great ideas of how to tell someone you love how much they mean to you. If you can resist the big-eyed baby animals on the front cover, then you’re a stronger person than me!

Recommended for ages 5-8.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Hammer and Nails

September 13, 2016

daddyHammer and Nails

By Josh Bledsoe

Illustrated by Jessica Warrick

I’m a daddy’s girl and nothing excites me more than seeing great daddy/daughter stories that show a dad can have an amazing relationship with his daughter. In Hammer and Nails, Darcy thinks her day is ruined when her best friend gets sick and can’t make it to their playdate. She had a whole list of fun things to do, but she crumples it up. When her daddy overhears her grumbling, he makes her a deal. If they can do one thing off his to-do list, then they can do one off of hers. What follows is an adorable mashup of daddy’s chores and Darcy’s playdate plans.

Hammer and Nails is a charming story about trying things for the first time and might inspire kids and adults both to find the fun in chores. The characters are so expressive, especially faced with that ONE thing that they’re not sure about. I would recommend this story to anyone, daddies, daughters, mothers, and sons.  As the daddy in this book puts it “Sometimes things you’ve never done end up being fun! Try it.”

Recommended for ages 5-7.

Nicki Paris

Schimelpfenig Library

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