Posts Tagged ‘children’s picture book’

Sidewalk Flowers

April 24, 2015

Sidewalk-Flowers-by-Jon-Arno-Lawson-on-BookDragonSidewalk Flowers

by JonArno Lawson and Sydney Smith

In this beautiful wordless picture book, a little girl walks through the city with her father collecting colorful flowers she finds growing in overlooked places. As she walks, she sees others who look like they could use a little bit of color too, so she leaves a little bit of cheer behind her as she goes, saving herself for last. A great way to talk about feelings of loneliness and sadness and about caring for others’ feelings. And the illustrations are detailed and absolutely gorgeous — worth pouring over multiple times!

Reviewed by: Lara (Haggard Library)

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If You Plant a Seed

April 23, 2015

If You Plant a Seed

By Kadir Nelson

 This gorgeously illustrated book has few words, but says a lot.  A beautiful lesson about the benefits of sharing over selfishness is told through both the words and the illustrations.

This book provides a great opportunity for you to discuss the events in the pictures and have your little one explain to you what is happening when the bunny and mouse choose to/not to share. This is a good choice for a preschool group read too.  Happy reading!

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Goatilocks and the Three Bears

April 9, 2015

goatilocksGoatilocks and the Three Bears by Erica S. Perl

A fractured version of Goldilocks featuring a “kid,” a young goat, as the main character. The goat is as audacious as Goldilocks but with a goat-like twist: she eats everything! How can she make it up to the bears? There’s a surprising and satisfying answer to round out the story. The comical, cartoon-style illustrations add to the humor in this pleasing fractured fairy tale.goatilocks 2

So what is a fractured fairy tale? Take a regular fairy tale, then change the gender(s) of some of the characters, mix up the setting, add a little humor, and you have a new version of an old favorite.

These titles are often great for reading aloud with children who know the traditional tale well and can enjoy the humor of a different version. We have a list of them here.

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How Do Dinosaurs Stay Safe?

April 2, 2015

dinoHow Do Dinosaurs Stay Safe?

By Jane Yolen and Mark Teague

If you’re familiar with the How Do Dinosaurs series, you know that they cover a wide range of expected behaviors for kids. Yolen uses dinosaurs, a favorite for almost any child, to teach kids the best way to act and interact with their environment. In the newest book in the series, the dinosaurs show kids how to stay safe. The last few lines are my favorite. Dinosaur is “careful, not fearful. So here’s a big roar. Stay safe and play safe, little dinosaur.”

With open-ended questions all through the beginning of the book, How Do Dinosaurs Stay Safe? get the kids involved in answering with their ideas about staying safe. The humorous and colorful pictures of the dinos are engaging, while the ‘parents’ of the dinosaurs react in the backgrounds. If you look closely on each page, you’ll find the scientific names of all the dinosaurs pictured!

Recommended for ages 3-5.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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A Lullaby for Little One

March 31, 2015

lullA Lullaby for Little One

By Dawn Casey

Illustrated by Charles Fuge

This sweet story of a big daddy bunny and his baby bunny follows the pair all over their meadow as they play with friends. They hop and frolic and chase each other, playing hide and seek and peek-a-boo. At the end of the day, baby bunny gets a case of a sniffles when he gets tired. They say goodbye to their friends and big daddy bunny sings his little one a sweet lullaby.

Full of colorful, joyful illustrations, this story is a great bedtime treat for your little one. The rhyming text is soothing and predictable, allowing younger readers to become involved with guessing what could come next.

Recommended for ages 2-4.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Book-o-Beards

March 25, 2015

 Book-0-Beards: A Wearable Book

By Donald B. Lemke

Book-o-beards : a wearable book

This hilarious board book is filled with beards. Not just any beards though; outrageous beards that you can hold up to your face to create a different look with each beard. You can be a police officer, lumber jack, pirate, and more. This super silly book is fantastic fun for preschool age children and up (and their parents!) Be sure to have your camera on hand for this one. Happy reading!

Take a look at Anna from Parr Library having some silly beard fun.

police officer

 

pirate

lumberjack

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If your little one enjoys this book, why not try:

Book-o-Hats

Book-o-hats : a wearable book

Book-o-Masks

Book-o-masks : a wearable book

Book-o-Teeth

Book-o-teeth : a wearable book

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Monkey with a Tool Belt and the Noisy Problem

March 19, 2015

Monkey with a Tool Belt and the Noisy Problem

Written and illustrated by Chris Monroe

Chico Bon Bon, errant repairmonkey, is back with his tool belt in this companion book to Monkey with a Tool BeltWhen Chico wakes to a loud clatter, he searches his tree house to discover the source of the noise, only to find an elephant named Clark in his laundry shoot!  Can Chico solve this noisy problem?

As with the other two books featuring Chico (Monkey with a Tool Belt and Monkey with a Tool Belt and the Seaside Shenanigans), Monroe’s quirky illustrations and shameless sense of humor are a picture book win.  Jokes for both kids and adults make this adventure even more fun; be sure to read the entire list of tools on Chico’s tool belt to be rewarded with plenty of laughs!  With whimsicality and an eye on problem-solving skills, Chico may have kids asking for a tool belt of their own.  Recommended for preschool – 3rd grade.

 

Reviewed by Alyssa (Davis Library)

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Nancy Knows

February 27, 2015

nancyNancy Knows

By Cybele Young

Nancy the elephant can remember all sorts of things, but she knows she’s forgetting something important! As she tries to remember, we can see all of the things she’s thinking about filling up her line art. To try and determine what she’s forgotten, she remembers things that she knows. All sorts of paper sculptures fill the elephant as she thinks about things that are similar, like the same shape or color, things that face one way, then another, things in neat rows and things that are a jumbled mess. Nancy helps the reader lean about many opposites in her quest to remember what she’s forgotten. When she finally stops thinking and lets her mind rest, the answer finally comes to her!

Nancy Knows is a precious book with lots of little details to offer. You and your little one will find yourselves examining each picture to see what all you can find in Nancy’s thoughts. Challenge your child to think of other opposites that Nancy has forgotten, like hot and cold, or high and low.

Recommended for ages 4-7.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Lost Sloth

February 10, 2015

Lost Sloth

By J. Otto Seibold

Sloth’s phone rings and rings. He races across the room to answer the call, but he’s a sloth, so it takes a while. The phone says he’s won an afternoon shopping spree! Can the sloth get to the store in time to claim his prize?

This book is just too good!  The fun story and colorful pictures will draw readers in, while quirky details in the illustrations make Lost Sloth perfect for repeat readings.  The ending is so clever, and just right for a sloth;  I wish I could be friends with this sloth!  Don’t dismiss this book as just a part of the current pop-culture sloth craze; Lost Sloth’s quirky originality put it in a class of its own!  Recommended for ages 3-6.


Reviewed by: Alyssa (Davis Library)

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Doug Unplugs on the Farm

February 6, 2015

dougDoug Unplugs on the Farm

By: Dan Yaccarino

Doug, an adorable golden robot who wants to learn about his world, returns in his second book Doug Unplugs on the Farm. As a city robot, Doug doesn’t know much about what happens on a farm. He has downloaded information about cows and plows and pigs, but he prefers to learn by doing. While he knows milk comes from cows, he learns that a cow’s tongue feels rough. As he helps out a local farm girl, he finds all sorts of new information, like the fact that hay is prickly and fresh apples straight from the tree are delicious (and that the horse thinks the apples AND the hay are delicious!)

This sweet, simple book shows how learning things first-hand can mean so much more to a child than ‘downloading’ things from the internet. There’s so many senses for us to use while we take in new experiences. Use this book to talk with your little one about how taste, smell, sound, and touch can change the way we look at the world!

If you like Doug Unplugs on the Farm, make sure to check out his first book:

doug1

Doug Unplugged

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recommended for ages 4-7.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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