Posts Tagged ‘children’s picture book’

I Hear a Pickle

February 9, 2016

hearpickleI Hear a Pickle (and Smell, See, Touch, and Taste It, Too!) by Rachel Isadora

Parents, and teachers of preschool children often ask for books about the five senses. Isadora’s new book will be perfect to suggest.

Each sense is described over several pages, with simple sentences beside small illustrations of children in action. The final page features the child from the cover eating a delicious pickle, as he tastes, smells, sees, touches and hears the pickle.  “Crunch!”

Come by the library to check out this fun new book to read to children while talking about their senses. I’m off to buy a jar of pickles!

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No More Cuddles!

February 5, 2016

No More Cuddles!

by Jane Chapman

Barry is a lovable and huggable hairy monster who enjoys life in the forest. He particularly loves his walks, listening to the birds and munching on berries. Basically, he just loves his own company! Unfortunately, he is rarely left alone as he is just too cuddly for his own good.  Animals from all over the forest love to come and cuddle him because he is sooooo soft!  Barry likes cuddles but unfortunately for him, his forest friends overdo it by smothering him with cuddles all the time – rarely giving him a moment alone.  Bunnies, badgers, beavers and even a tortoise leap onto him smoothing, patting, stroking, fluffing and crying “Come here, Snuggle-wuggles!”  What was poor Barry to do?  Pretend to be a tree? That attracts squirrels.  Put on an angry face? Then the animals think he needs a cuddle to cheer him up!  Nothing works!  Or does it?  Barry tries and tries to calm his cuddlers down until finally one day he may (or may not) have discovered the solution.

Once again Jane Chapman has written and illustrated a delightfully humorous story that begs to be read aloud.  Her colorful illustrations jump off the page and bring her lovable characters to life. I’m afraid that I, too, might have joined in the cuddling had I met an adorable monster like Barry!

Reviewed by Connie (Parr Library)

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Freedom in Congo Square

February 3, 2016

congoFreedom in Congo Square

By Carole Boston Weatherford

Illustrated by R. Gregory Christie

New Orleans has a history of music and dance dating all the way back to colonial times. These two Coretta Scott King honorees set out to tell the story of Congo Square, a place that served as a refuge for enslaved and free African Americans alike. During this time, there was a law stating that Sunday must be a day of rest, so for half a day a week the slaves of New Orleans gathered in Congo Square. This was where they could sing and dance and forget their oppression for a little while.

Freedom in Congo Square tells of people’s capacity to find hope and joy even under the most difficult circumstances. Through bright, vivid paintings and simple language, this story can start a conversation on a much deeper subject. Consider pairing this with other books like Ellen’s Broom and I, Too, am America as a story time for Black History Month.

Recommended for ages 4-8.

Nicole P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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All Year Round

January 29, 2016

All Year Round

By Susan B. Katz

 

In this fun and engaging picture book, a different shape corresponds to each month. The illustrations are bold, bright and colorful.

I enjoyed the connections made by the author between each month and the activity used to introduce the shape. This book is a fun way to help your little one learn (or reinforce their knowledge of) their shapes.  It is a great group read for preschool classes, too.  Happy Reading!

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Cockatoo, Too

January 26, 2016

cockatooCockatoo, Too

By Bethanie Deeney Murguia

Every struggle with the difference between two, too, and to? I know I have! In this delightful and colorful book, a cockatoo explores all the different forms of the word. The text is simple, but helps the reader better understand how two cockatoos are different than cockatoos, too! By the time the tutus and the toucans show up, you’ll be giggling as you try to say these short tongue twisters!

As the two cockatoos in tutus and the two cockatoos in tutus, too start to can-can with the toucans, you’ll agree with the tiny bird at the end of the book. It’s all “too, too much!” A fun book that introduces the reader to word play, as well as  helps introduce the idea of two, too, and to!

Recommended for ages 3-6

Nicole P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Noni the Pony Goes to the Beach

January 21, 2016

nonibeachNoni the Pony Goes to the Beach by Alison Lester

I’m ready for a warm sunny day, and a trip to the beach.  How about you?  If you need some inspiration, check out Noni the Pony Goes to the Beach. In this charming story, Noni and her friends, Dave Dog and Coco the Cat, go on an adventure to the beach.  Slightly silly, and full of rhyming words, this book will be perfect for your favorite preschooler.

And if this book puts you in the mood for more books about the beach, try our Beach theme bag, which includes nine books, a puppet, and a felt rhyme about sandcastles.  Search the catalog for keywords: Beach theme, or search theme bag for a list of all of our themes.

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The Seeds of Friendship

January 19, 2016

The seeds of friendshipThe Seeds of Friendship

By: Michael Foreman

This touching picture book tells the story of a boy named Adam who moved to a strange new city. When he looks out of his bedroom window all he sees is gray. Adam misses the faraway place he used to live. He especially misses the colorful forest and the animals he used to see. Adam’s favorite place at his new school is the green garden. When his teacher gives him some seeds to take home, it plants an idea in his mind. Adam plants the seeds of friendship.

Enjoy!

Reviewed by: Renee (Parr Library)

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Race Car Count

December 29, 2015

Race Car Count

By Rebecca Kai Dotlich

 

Does your little one like cars? Counting? Rhyming? Then this is a great book for you!  In Race Car Count, the large colorful illustrations are eye catching and as you count the cars from 1-10 the rhyming is fun and entertaining. The large and colorful text makes this a great storytime or preschool read, and the ‘Meet the Race Cars’ page at the end of the book is an absolute blast! It’s great fun to learn each cars name, favorite foods and collectables. Be sure to give this one a try. Happy reading!

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Big Bot, Small Bot: a Book of Opposites

December 26, 2015

bigbotBig Bot Small Bot: A Book of Robot Opposites by Marc Rosenthal

Robot lovers, gather round!  Rosenthal’s robot themed opposites book is a winner.  Each page features a concept with a flap, which reveal eight opposites.  The text size reinforces the first two concepts, big/small and quiet/loud, and although the remaining six concepts do not include variations in text size or placement, the illustrations playfully engage the reader.

The book is small and square, perfect for little hands.  Parents and children alike love moveable books, so the flaps will soon be well worn.

Check this one out from the library today…I like it so much that I would purchase it for a young reader to cherish!

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Such a Little Mouse

December 22, 2015

mouseSuch a Little Mouse

By Alice Schertle

Illustrated by Stephanie Yue

Share little mouse’s adventures through the year as he explores his world during spring, summer, fall, and winter. He meets new creatures with every outing, making new friends as he looks for food. Every day he brings a little something home. Sometimes it’s nuts or seeds, sometimes a nice bit of watercress. Each piece goes way down deep in his burrow so he’s ready for winter. And with each new season comes a page of repeated words that you and your little one can say together. “One, Two, Three! Such a little mouse. Off he goes into the wide world.”

This cute book teaches readers a lot about the world. As you follow little mouse’s adventures, you’ll see what happens to an area during different seasons, and what kind of animals are active during each part of the years. It also teaches how animals store food for the winter (though they probably don’t have the great reading material this little mouse has at home).

Recommended for ages 3-5.

Nicole P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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