Posts Tagged ‘children’s picture book’

The Best Sweater

April 26, 2016

sweaterThe Best Sweater

by Lynne Garner

illustrated by Sarah Gill

Spindle the mouse gets a handmade sweater from his grandmother and decides that it is the BEST sweater ever. It fits so perfectly that he wears it everywhere, even when it’s not cold (he ties it around his waist, just in case). Like all sweaters, especially those given lots of love, it gets a little tear. Mama fixes it, but soon there’s another problem! It won’t fit over his ears! After being snipped and sewed and fixed over and over, the best sweater finally finds new life as another surprise from Grandma.

This is a sweet story about family, growing up, and learning that things will always be changing. Soft watercolor and pastel drawings fill the pages with color, making this a beautiful book to share with your little one. It might just give you an idea of how to to ease the transition from a well-loved blanket or toy.

Recommended for ages 4-8.

Nicole P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Beatrix Potter & the Unfortunate Tale of a Borrowed Guinea Pig

April 23, 2016

Deborah Hopkinson

When I discovered this new book in the library, Beatrix Potter & the Unfortunate Tale of a Borrowed Guinea Pig,  I couldn’t wait to read it. Beatrix Potter is a well-known and loved children’s book author and one of my favorites.  I’m sure we have all read some of her delightful tales and are quite aware of her love for animals.  Even as a small child, Beatrix and her brother enjoyed many different kind of pets.  She had frogs, salamanders, lizards, hedgehogs and newts just to name a few of her unusual pets and she loved to paint them.  So her request to paint her neighbor’s guinea pig was of no surprise to anyone.  Beatrix picked the prettiest guinea pig, Queen Elizabeth.   Beatrix was pleased with the guinea pig’s portrait but was summoned to a dinner party.  Little did she know that Queen Elizabeth was quite hungry and decided to munch on glue, string and paper while Beatrix was at dinner.  Devastated might be the word to use when Beatrix found Queen Elizabeth the next morning.  She had expired due to her previous evening’s meal.  Would Miss Nina Paget, her neighbor,  forgive her when Queen Elizabeth was brought back home?  A distressed Beatrix asked for forgiveness and also gave her the beautiful picture she had painted of Queen Elizabeth.

This noted author, Deborah Hopkinson has written a humorous and charming book about Beatrix that I’m sure you will enjoy.  The author has also added pictures and a small biography of Beatrix Potter in the back of the book along with a note to all readers:  “What would you have done in Miss Nina Paget’s shoes.  You many have been wise and kept the picture since Beatrix Potter became so famous that many of her pictures sold for thousands of pounds.”

On another note, the illustrations by Charlotte Voake capture your imagination and add to the charm of this delightful book.

 

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Welcome Spring!

April 21, 2016

Wabracadabra it's spring coverith fun vocabulary and richly-colored illustrations, Abracadabra, It’s Spring! is an absolute delight to read aloud, and perfect for preschoolers.

Stylized, colored text focuses attention on the magical words that herald a change, and gate-fold pages add an element of surprise.

A little green shoot comes into focus. Alakazam!  [Open the fold out page]  Now it’s a crocus!  Buds on trees become leaves; sticks and strings become a nest; and cocoons become colorful butterflies.  The rhyme is spot-on and the repetition leads to the invitation to look at every bright new thing! Abracadabra! Now it’s spring.

Enjoy this book’s energetic, joyful ode to the magical changes that the spring season brings.

it's spring page

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A Hungry Lion or a Dwindling Assortment of Animals

April 19, 2016

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A Hungry Lion or a Dwindling Assortment of Animals

by Lucy Ruth Cummins

The very hungry lion is all set to enjoy an exciting day with his other animal pals. But all of a sudden his friends start disappearing at an alarming rate! Is someone stealing the hungry lion’s friends, or is the culprit a little…closer to home?

With sharp wit, adorable illustrations, and hysterical twists galore, this debut picture book asks—what do you think happened to the hungry lion’s friends?

I picked this one up when it first came in, mainly because of the title. I wanted to find out why the assortment of animals was dwindling! I had an idea, and at first it seemed like my idea was correct, but then came a twist! But is it the only twist? As Jon Klassen (author and illustrator of I Want My Hat Back and This is Not My Hat) has said about it: “So smart and so cute and so dark all at the same time.” Exactly! But dark in the funniest possible way. If you’re a fan of Klassen’s you’ll probably enjoy this book just as much.
Happy reading!
Reviewed by: Lara (Haggard)

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Go Home Flash

April 7, 2016

Go Home FlashGo Home Flash

By: Ruth Paul

“Playful puppy Flash doesn’t want to stay home—he wants to go on adventures with his favorite people!  Even to places he shouldn’t be… But his owners know it’s because he misses them while they’re away, and they miss him too!” (from cover)

All Flash wants is to be with his family but everyone is just so busy!  This is the second book featuring this scruffy little mutt with a penchant for mischief.  The story is a fun and easy read great for early readers or children who are just getting familiar with words.  There are plenty of rhyming words and repetition to help build early literacy skills.  The pictures are bright and playful with small action sequences and big full-page illustrations.  If you enjoy this book, be sure to check out the first Flash book or one of Ruth Paul’s other animal tales!

    Product Details

Reviewed by: Meredith (Harrington Library)

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My Dog’s a Chicken

March 30, 2016

dog'schicken

My Dog’s a Chicken by Susan McElroy Montanari, illustrated by Anne Wilsdorf

Lula Mae wants a puppy. You might think that this is a theme you’ve read before, but I think you’ll be pleasantly surprised!  Lula Mae lives on a farm full of chickens, and times are hard.  So rather than give up her dream of a puppy, she makes do with what she has, and names one of the chickens, “Pookie.”  She completes the picture by clipping a red ribbon on Pookie’s head.

Children will enjoy hearing this story read aloud. They will “Bawk!” with Pookie, and laugh at the family antics.  The colorful painted illustrations by Anne Wilsdorf are pleasing, and I love all the big round chicken eyes!

This is a new favorite of mine. I think you’ll like it too!

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Dig In!

March 29, 2016

Dig In!

By Cindy Jenson-Elliott

 

This new book about playing outdoors is a wonderful find. I still remember the fun I had digging in the dirt as a child! With its large, adorably bold illustrations and simple phrasing, this read is a great choice for younger children. The large size of the fabulous illustrations makes this a great group read-aloud too.

After enjoying this book, kids will most likely want to go outside and begin their own exploring. Dig in to this book and get ready for some outdoor fun with your little one.  Happy reading!

 

 

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The Night Gardener

March 24, 2016

The Night GardenerThe Night Gardener

By: The Fan Brothers

This delightful picture book tells the story of a town that is transformed by the magic of a night gardener. On Grimloch Lane, the townspeople, including an orphan boy named William, are down in the dumps. When a nocturnal gardener transforms the trees and topiaries into wondrous creations, the town begins to come to life. People start playing outside, drawing, and looking up in wonder at the sculpted owl, elephant, rabbit and other topiaries. William spies the gardener one night and tags along for a lesson in gardening. The duo create a leafy menagerie in the park that will delight readers. The illustrations are gorgeous and they change from gray pencil to bright hues gradually throughout the story. This is a book to be savored and read again and again.   It is lovely.

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Loud Lula

March 23, 2016

loud

Loud Lula

By Katy S. Duffield

Illustrated by Mike Boldt

Lula was born during the biggest, loudest tornado the county had ever seen. When Lula let out her first cry, that tornado “sounded like nothing more than a chicken feather hitting the henhouse floor”. As Lula gets older, it’s obvious that she’s always going to have a voice that can carry for miles. She starts school and has to learn how an ‘inside voice’ is better to use, but she just can’t get the hang of it!

All throughout the book, Lula’s words JUMP right off the page. Sometimes they’re knocking people over with how loud they are. This whole book has a warm country twang that makes it a blast to read. Lula uses fun idioms like “turn over my tickle box” that will have everyone giggling. Use this fun book to have a conversation with your child about the difference between an inside and outside voice. Another useful teaching tool is music. Turn it way up and sing with your outside voice, then down to sing with the inside voice, it can help your child understand the difference when you later ask for that quieter tone.

Recommended for ages 4-8.

Nicole P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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The Wonder

March 10, 2016

The Wonder

The Wonder

By: Faye Hanson

“This is a story about a boy whose head is full of wonder.” (from cover)

The boy wonders about simple things like what clouds are made of and then he lets his imagination spin fanciful answers.  However, his daydreaming gets him in trouble with many adults.  He finally finds a place to let his imagination run wild… art class!  With a teacher who encourages creativity, his wonder-filled musings become fantastic, page-filling scenes.

This book is truly a sight to behold!  Starting out in sepia tones, small bits of colors appear with every new daydream the boy has, only to be chased away by chastising grown-ups.  When he’s finally allowed to fully explore his imaginings, Hanson goes all out with vibrant, colorful double-page illustrations.  This style of book is best enjoyed in a one-on-one, parent and child setting so that you can fully explore these beautiful pictures.  The illustrations provide a perfect opportunity to let your child develop their storytelling skills by describing what they see.  To top it all off, this story has a lovely ending that proves small musings can lead to great things if we take the time to nurture them!

Reviewed by: Meredith (Harrington Library)

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