Posts Tagged ‘friendship’

Goose Goes to School

July 29, 2015

by Laura Wall

In her follow up book to Goose, Goose Goes to School reminds me of a nursery rhyme we all might recall, “Mary Had a Little Lamb”.  I’m sure we can all remember how Mary’s little lamb was forbidden to go to school with Mary.  That sneaky little lamb did follow her to school which brings us to this new book, Goose Goes to School.  Even though Sophie’s mother forbids goose from going to school with her, Sophie hears unusual sounds while walking to school with her mother.  She keeps seeing little reminders of goose throughout the day and is sure she has spotted him several times.  Who should suddenly appear in her classroom while the teacher isn’t looking?  Who makes the children laugh and play?

Goose Goes to School is about friendship as well as a beloved pet.  You can reminisce about “Mary and Her Little Lamb” as well as enjoy reading about a goose that loves being with his special friend.  The illustrations are bright and colorful and just makes turning each page delightful.  This book can be enjoyed by your little ones as well as in a group situation.

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Stick and Stone

July 28, 2015

Stick and Stone

By Beth Ferry

Stick and Stone are lonely and alone until they become the best of friends, then they make a perfect 10! Read along and watch their friendship grow through simple rhyming text and beautifully illustrated adventures.

Tom Lichtenheld’s absolutely adorable artwork brings life to each of the characters. This charming story tells how friendship grows and how friends help each other.  The book makes for great discussion with your little reader(s).  Even though Stick and Stone don’t look the same they are friends; friends that help each other and play together, and stay together.  This is a great book with a great message.  Happy reading!

 

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Last Stop on Market Street

July 2, 2015

last stop on market streetLast Stop on Market Street

by Matt de la Pena; illustrations by Christian Robinson

This simple story follows CJ and his Nana as they ride the bus across town after church. CJ has many questions to be answered – Why don’t they have a car? How come that man is blind? Why is this area of the city so dirty? Luckily, his Nana is there to point out the beauty in each situation.

Christian Robinson’s illustrations are colorful and bold –  a perfect complement to Matt de la Pena’s strong visual language. I loved the use of similes and metaphors spotted throughout the beginning. Encourage your child to describe some of their routines or draw the world around them.

Reviewed by Kate (Haggard)

 

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Turtle Island

June 2, 2015

turtleTurtle Island

By Kevin Sherry

The ocean is a very big place, as Kevin Sherry taught us in his other picture books I’m the Biggest Thing in the Ocean and I’m the Best Artist in the Ocean. The giant turtle in Turtle Island is lonely. Even though he is VERY big, he doesn’t have any friends. A big storm changes that one day and he meets four animals who all have special talents. Together, they make turtle their new home (and the first Turtle Island). Turtle is so happy to have friends that he forgets Bear, Cat, Owl, and Frog all have homes and families. He must say a teary goodbye to his new friends, but not for long! Soon his friends return with a special surprise!

With fun, bright colors and friendly characters, Turtle Island is a fun read to share together. It has simple text, but so much to look at in the tiny towns on turtle’s back. Try using the pictures to tell your own story with your child to encourage their imaginations.

Recommended for ages 3-5.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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New Shoes

May 7, 2015

index (1)New Shoes

by Susan Lynn Meyer

illustrated by Eric Velasquez

Ella Mae always got hand-me-down shoes from family. She looked into the shop windows of the local shoe shop with longing, wishing she could have her very own pair of new shoes. As she got close to the next year of school, the traditional hand-me-down phase of shoes got her a pair that just don’t fit. For the first time, she went to the shoe store and pick out a new pair of shoes. Instead of getting to try on the new shoes like the white girl in the shop ahead of her, Ella Mae had to trace around her feet on a piece of paper so the shop owner could guess at her size. Embarrassed, Ella Mae doesn’t even enjoy her new shoes. In response, Ella Mae and her friend Charlotte decide to make a shoe store all their own where ANYONE can try on their shoes before they buy them.

Set in the 1960s when segregation was still going strong in the south, New Shoes is a great way to learn about the history of our country. Ella Mae and Charlotte’s creative and determined approach to overcoming discrimination is inspiring for any reader.

Recommended for grades 1-3.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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Hug Me

April 28, 2015

indexHug Me

By Simona Ciraolo

Hug Me is the story of Felipe, a young cactus who came from a family that kept everything neat and tidy and believed one should NEVER trespass into another’s personal space. The problem was, Felipe wanted a hug. He was taught to keep still, that he was for looking and not touching. He stretched himself up like the rest of his family, wishing that someone, anyone, would come by and wrap their arms around him.

One day, Felipe got in trouble, so he decided to leave. Felipe thought that maybe he was better off by himself, until he heard someone else who was feeling lonely too. Cactus or not, Felipe knew just what to do! With a big hug, Felipe makes his first real friend.

Recommended for ages 3-5.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig library

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Fish in a Tree

April 17, 2015

Fish in a treeFish in a Tree

By: Lynda Mullaly Hunt

Sixth-grader Ally Nickerson has passed through seven schools in seven years and has hidden a deep, dark secret at each one. She can’t read and to cover up the shame she feels, she acts out and winds up in the principal’s office at each school. However, at Ally’s current school a long-term substitute, Mr. Daniels, sees through Ally’s charade. He tells Ally that he suspects she has dyslexia and provides tools to help Ally overcome her learning disability. Ally is also dealing with a father who is deployed in the Middle East and she struggles to make friends at her new school. The supporting cast of quirky characters who are dealing with their own problems round out the story and add interest beyond the focus on dyslexia. This is a touching story that pays tribute to teachers that go the extra mile for their students. Fans of R.J. Palacio’s Wonder may enjoy this title.

Fish in a Tree is Lynda Mullaly Hunt’s second middle-grade novel. Her first novel, One for the Murphys was published in 2012. Hunt is an expert at exploring themes of family and friendship. I hope she continues to write middle-grade books because I plan to read everything she writes.

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Hey Duck and Just a Duck!

April 16, 2015

I couldn’t resist writing about these two books written and illustrated by Carin Bramsen,  Hey Duck and Just a Duck! The  illustrations are large and  beautiful and so realistic you just want to reach out and touch each fuzzy animal.  Speaking of animals we meet duck and cat.  Duck is an extremely friendly fellow and he is sure he has found a new friend, another duck.  He keeps asking the duck why is tail is so long?  Why doesn’t he like to swim in water?  Why doesn’t he quack?  You might be able to guess that his new friend is a cat.  Cat gets quite annoyed at this pesky duck but eventually responds to duck, “My sense of ME has gone AMUCK!” and begins to quack just like duck.  They form a bond through this adventure and their friendship is sealed.

 

Just a Duck? the sequel begins with duck deciding to become a cat.  Even though both cat and duck realize he looks nothing like a cat, duck is sure he can grow into a cat. Duck tries to walk like a cat, meow like a cat and act like a cat so you can imagine how silly this  duck is portrayed.  With considerable regret, duck has to come to the realization that he is just a duck!.

I enjoyed reading both of these books and the interactions between the duck and cat were both hilarious and enjoyable to read about.  These are great books for for our youngsters to enjoy with their parents or in a group setting.  These two books just bring a smile to your face.

Beverly (Davis)

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Roller Girl

April 13, 2015

roller girlRoller Girl

by Victoria Jamieson

Astrid’s mother loves to take Astrid and her best friend, Nicole, to museums, poetry readings, and even the opera. The girls couldn’t care less about these cultural evenings. Until, one night, Astrid’s mother surprises them by taking them to a roller derby. Astrid falls in love with the excitement, the boldness, and the culture of roller girls. She’s shocked when Nicole doesn’t want to sign up for the roller derby with her. Can Astrid survive the summer without her best friend? Will they still be the same once middle school starts?

Jamieson tells a great story about growing up. Change is hard to deal with sometimes, especially when you aren’t ready for it. However, Astrid learns how to stay true to herself and to her friends as she’s confronted with huge changes. This story is great for fans of Raina Telgemeier, Cece Bell’s El Deafo, and Zita the Spacegirl. Or, if you haven’t read those titles either, give them a try! They won’t disappoint!

Reviewed by Kate (Haggard)

 

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Nancy Knows

February 27, 2015

nancyNancy Knows

By Cybele Young

Nancy the elephant can remember all sorts of things, but she knows she’s forgetting something important! As she tries to remember, we can see all of the things she’s thinking about filling up her line art. To try and determine what she’s forgotten, she remembers things that she knows. All sorts of paper sculptures fill the elephant as she thinks about things that are similar, like the same shape or color, things that face one way, then another, things in neat rows and things that are a jumbled mess. Nancy helps the reader lean about many opposites in her quest to remember what she’s forgotten. When she finally stops thinking and lets her mind rest, the answer finally comes to her!

Nancy Knows is a precious book with lots of little details to offer. You and your little one will find yourselves examining each picture to see what all you can find in Nancy’s thoughts. Challenge your child to think of other opposites that Nancy has forgotten, like hot and cold, or high and low.

Recommended for ages 4-7.

Nicki P.

Schimelpfenig Library

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